anaerobe

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Related to Anaerobes: Facultative anaerobes

anaerobe

 [an´er-ōb]
an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.(See accompanying table.) adj., adj anaero´bic.
facultative anaerobe a microorganism that can live and grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobe an organism that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen.

an·aer·obe

(an'ār-ōb, an-ār'ōb),
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of dioxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe

/an·aer·obe/ (an´ah-rōb) an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.
facultative anaerobes  microorganisms that can live and grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobes  microorganisms that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen; some are killed by oxygen.

anaerobe

(ăn′ə-rōb′, ăn-âr′ōb′)
n.
An organism, such as a bacterium, that can live in the absence of free oxygen.

anaerobe

[aner′ōb]
Etymology: Gk, a + aer, not air, bios, life
a microorganism that grows and lives in the complete or almost complete absence of oxygen. An example is Clostridium botulinum. Anaerobes are widely distributed in nature and in the body. Types include the facultative anaerobe and the obligate anaerobe. Compare aerobe, microaerophile. See also anaerobic infection. anaerobic, adj.

anaerobe

Any organism, usually a bacterium, capable of living without air. Anaerobic pathogens obtain their energy from fermentation; nonpathogenic anaerobes in nature obtain their energy from anaerobic respiration, in which nitrate or sulphate serve as electron acceptors.

The ropharynx, skin, colon and vagina harbor up to 1011 anaerobes/cm3; they are common causes of infection, and may be associated with aerobic flora in infections and abscesses of the oral cavity, upper respiratory tract, colon, genital tract, skin and brain; factors controlling anaerobes’ virulence are uncertain.
 
Management
Penicillin for supradiaphragmatic anaerobic infections; clindamycin, metronidazole, chloramphenicol or cephoxatin if the infection is below the diaphragm.

an·aer·obe

(an'ār-ōb)
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of oxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe

an organism able to metabolize in the absence of free oxygen, obtaining energy from the breakdown of glucose in ANAEROBIC RESPIRATION. Some anaerobes are obligate, i.e. they can only survive in the absence of oxygen; examples are bacteria that cause food poisoning (see BOTULISM). Others (the majority) can live in either the presence or the absence of oxygen and are called facultative. When oxygen is present, respiration in these types is of the aerobic type involving the KREBS CYCLE to release maximum energy; when oxygen is absent they rely solely on energy released in anaerobic respiration.

Anaerobe

A type of bacterium that does not require air or oxygen to live. Anaerobic bacteria are frequent causes of lung abscess.

anaerobe

microorganism that survives in the absence of free oxygen
  • facultative anaerobe microorganism that lives with or without free oxygen

  • obligate anaerobe microorganism that cannot survive in the presence of free oxygen

an·aer·obe

(an-ār'ōb)
A microorganism that can live and grow in the absence of oxygen.
[G. an- priv. + aēr, air, + bios, life]

anaerobe (an´ərōb),

n a microorganism that can exist and grow only in the partial or complete absence of molecular oxygen.
anaerobe, facultative
n an organism that can grow in the absence or presence of oxygen.

anaerobe

an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.

facultative anaerobe
a microorganism that can grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobe
an organism that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen.
References in periodicals archive ?
At JH and CHB a de-escalation approach is used, with drugs that are effective against both [beta]-lactamase-positive aerobic bacteria and anaerobes.
Anaerobes should be considered in the pathology of vertebral osteomyelitis, and all specimens should be sent for anaerobic cultures.
The new report entitled Hospital Anti-Infectives Insight Series: Intra-Abdominal Infections also finds that 96 percent of surveyed physicians cite a drug's activity against anaerobes as the leading attribute in antibiotic selection.
Cultivation and identification of anaerobes is only a small fraction of the workload, yet it is one of the more costly, time-consuming, and labor-intensive jobs in the field of microbiology.
Besides the "infernal trio" (Streptococcus pneumoniae, H influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis), chronic sinusitis aspirates contain other bacteria, including anaerobes and gram-negative bacteria.
The "angina" in this syndrome refers to an acute pharyngeal infection with the anaerobe Fusobacterium necrophorum.
fragilis exhibits the broadest spectrum of recognized resistance to antimicrobial agents among anaerobes, the worldwide rate of metronidazole resistance remains low, [is less than] 5% (1,2).
Some anaerobes, especially the gram-negative rods, can produce a variety of tissue-destroying enzymes, such as hyaluronidase, collagenase, or hemolysins.
GI Effects also combines all traditional components of stool analysis, plus tests pathogens, identifies anaerobes, and more at no additional charge.
Bacterial detection has shed quite a bit of light on organisms that have not been recoverable even though they are perfectly respectable aerobes or anaerobes.
From this sheet, totals were calculated for our four categories of positive cultures: those with pathogens, contaminants, anaerobes, and mixed organisms.
Wyeth is seeking market approval for Tygacil as a single agent therapy to treat patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAI) and complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSI), caused by gram- negative and gram-positive pathogens, anaerobes, and both methicillin- susceptible and methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA).