Amsel criteria

Amsel criteria

(am'sĕl),
criteria for clinical diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis; the diagnosis is made if three of the following four criteria are positive: homogeneous discharge, pH 4.8 or higher, presence of clue cells, and amine odor with the application of KOH to the discharge.

Amsel criteria

A clinical method for diagnosing bacterial vaginosis, which is regarded as positive if 3+ of 4 characteristics are seen:
• Homogenous appearance of discharge;
• pH > 4.5;
• Fishy amine odour on adding potassium hydroxide;
• Clue cells.

Am·sel cri·te·ria

(am'sel krī-tēr'ē-ă)
Findings necessary for clinical diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis; the diagnosis is made if three of the following four criteria are positive: homogeneous discharge, 4.8 pH or higher, presence of clue cells, and amine odor with the application of potassium hydroxide to the discharge.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, Amsel criteria diagnosed 43% of women suffering from bacterial vaginosis.
The Amsel criteria includes production of a grey-white discharge, increased vaginal pH >4.
Utility of Amsel criteria, Nugent score, and quantitative PCR for Gardnerella vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis, and Lactobacillus spp.
PCR assays have advantage over the two most commonly used methods for detecting lower genital tract bacteria; the Amsel criteria and the Gram stain, in that it is more sensitive.
Five hundred forty-four women (mean age, 33 years) with bacterial vaginosis diagnosed by the Amsel criteria or the Nugent scoring system were randomly assigned to receive, in double-blind fashion, 2 oral capsules per day of the combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 (GR-1/RC-14; more than 109 colony-forming units of each strain per capsule) or placebo for 6 weeks.
The 10 who returned for a checkup 1 month later were in remission, with no symptoms, no clue cells, a negative amine test result, and no more than one of four Amsel criteria.
10) In the trial, sponsored by LabCorp and conducted in association with Jane Schwebke, MD, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, all vaginal specimens were assessed using Amsel criteria and the Nugent Gram stain.
Utility of Amsel criteria, Nugent's score and quantitative PCR for Gardnerella vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis and Lactobacillus spp.
Inclusion criteria included women aged 15-30 years who met at least three out of four Amsel criteria for BV.
Because Amsel criteria are dependent on the acumen of the clinician, the Nugent score has been favoured for diagnosing BV due to superior reproducibility and sensitivity.
Because our participants met all 4 Amsel criteria and Gram stain criteria for diagnosis, their Gram stain scores were high, and no patient at any center was excluded because of severe symptoms, we do not believe our findings are limited to milder cases.