chirality

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chirality

 [ki-ral´ĭ-te]
the property of handedness, of not being superimposable on a mirror image; the handedness of an asymmetric molecule, as specified by its optical rotation or absolute configuration.

chi·ral·i·ty

(kī-ral'i-tē),
The property of nonidentity of an object with its mirror image; used in chemistry with respect to stereochemical isomers.
[G. cheir, hand]

chirality

(kī-răl′ĭ-tē)
n.
The aspect of a structure or property, such as the configuration of a molecule or the spin of a particle, that renders that structure or property distinguishable from its mirror image or symmetrical opposite. Also called handedness.

chirality

The left- or right-sidedness of virtually the entirety of the physical universe, from elementary particles—e.g., electrons and molecules—to highly complex organisms
Organic chemistry The 3-D conformation of a molecule, which has an either left-handed (levo- or l-) orientation, as do most molecules in functioning biologic systems, or right-handed (dextro- or d-) orientation

chi·ral·i·ty

(kī-ral'i-tē)
The property of nonidentity of an object with its mirror image; used in chemistry with respect to stereochemical isomers.
[G. cheir, hand]

chirality

The state of two molecules having identical structure except that they display ‘handedness’ (as in the right and left hand) and are mirror images of one another. Such pairs of molecules are also known as enantiomers or optical isomers. When dissolved in a fluid they rotate a plane-polarized beam in opposite directions.

chirality

(of STEREOISOMERS) the property of ‘handedness’ (right- or left-handedness) of a molecule, such that the mirror image cannot coincide exactly with the actual image.

chirality (kī·ralˑ·i·tē),

n the “handedness” property of organic compounds (containing an asymmetrical carbon) that gives rise to structures that are mirror images and that cannot be superimposed on each other; the two isomers are called optical isomers, which refers to their ability to rotate plane-polarized light.