Amphibia


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Related to Amphibia: Amphibians

Amphibia

 [am-fib´e-ah]
a class of animals that breathe by means of gills in the larval state but after metamorphosis breathe by means of lungs.

Amphibia

/Am·phib·ia/ (am-fib´e-ah) a class of vertebrates, including frogs, toads, newts, and salamanders, capable of living both on land and in water.

Amphibia

(am-fĭb′ē-ă) [Gr. amphibia (zōia), (animals) living a double life]
A class of cold-blooded animals that live on land and in water; includes salamanders, frogs, and toads. They breathe through gills during their aquatic larval stage but through lungs in their adult stage.

Amphibia

a class of animals containing the amphibians.
References in periodicals archive ?
Para facilitar la lectura, la plataforma de Amphibia ofrece una biblioteca privada a sus suscriptores donde se iran almacenando todos los libros que compra por licencia.
Pet reptiles, rodents, fish, birds, amphibia, arachnida and insects species are not affected by rabies or of no significance to the spreading of rabies.
The family Hylidae belongs to the ancient clan Amphibia.
Amphibia, the world's oldest terrestrial vertebrate class, is in trouble, for reasons that are unclear but probably numerous.
There is one chapter on diverse influences of ectotherms (fish, amphibia, and reptiles) and one on birds.
Linnaeus (see 1735) and others in the past three-quarters of a century had elaborated the taxonomy of vertebrates (those animals with backbones-mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibia, and fish) in considerable detail.
In amphibia and fish, some parts of the brain and spinal cord will regenerate the long fibers, which are called axons.
Formulacion del plan de conservacion de los Amphibia en reservas forestales" (Contratos interadministrativos de cooperacion cientifica y tecnologica Nos.
All food categories were grouped into 6 diet groups: mammalia aves reptilia- amphibia insecta planta and waste (waste means human left wastes).
Amphibia, Anura, Cycloramphidae, Proceratophrys concavitympanum Giaretta, Bernarde and Kokubum, 2000: Distribution extension for Brazilian Amazonia and first record in the state of Para.