amphetamine

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amphetamine

 [am-fet´ah-mēn]
1. a white crystalline powder used as a central nervous system stimulant. It is odorless and has a slightly bitter taste.
2. any of a group of drugs closely related to this substance and having similar actions, such as methamphetamine and dextroamphetamine. See also drug abuse and drug dependence.

am·phet·a·mine

(am-fet'ă-mēn),
A chemical compound that is structurally a sympathomimetic amine, considered a psychostimulant, and approved by the FDA to treat narcolepsy and ADHD; acts primarily by triggering release of norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin from presynaptic neurons. Because of its potential for abuse, it is scheduled by the FDA in the most restrictive classification for a drug with medical usefulness.

amphetamine

/am·phet·a·mine/ (am-fet´ah-mēn)
1. a sympathomimetic amine with a stimulating effect on both the central and peripheral nervous systems, used in the treatment of narcolepsy and attention-deficit, usually as the sulfate or aspartate salt. Abuse may lead to dependence.
2. any drug closely related to amphetamine and having similar actions, e.g., methamphetamine.

amphetamine

(ăm-fĕt′ə-mēn′, -mĭn)
n.
A synthetic compound, C9H13N, that occurs as a racemic mixture of two stereoisomers, or one of its stereoisomers (as dextroamphetamine), derivatives (as methamphetamine), or salts. Amphetamine acts as a central nervous system stimulant, and various formulations are used in the medical treatment of certain conditions (such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) and illegally as stimulants.

amphetamine

Pharmacology A CNS stimulant, anorexiant and drug of abuse Used for Hyperactivity; narcolepsy; obesity. See Drug Screening, Therapeutic drug monitoring.

am·phet·a·mine

(am-fet'ă-mēn)
A chemical compound that is structurally a sympathomimetic amine, considered a psychostimulant, and approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat narcolepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Because of its potential for abuse, it is scheduled by the FDA in the most restrictive classification for a drug with medical usefulness.

amphetamine

Amfetamine, a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant drug with few medical uses but commonly abused to obtain a ‘high’. Amphetamine use leads to tolerance and sometimes physical dependence. Overdosage causes irritability, tremor, restlessness, insomnia, flushing, nausea and vomiting, irregularity of the pulse, delirium, hallucinations, convulsions and coma. Amphetamine can precipitate a PSYCHOSIS in predisposed people.

amphetamine

a drug that stimulates the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and inhibits sleep. Its structure is 1-phenyl-2-aminopropane.

am·phet·a·mine

(am-fet'ă-mēn)
Structurally a sympathomimetic amine, considered a psychostimulant, and approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat narcolepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

amphetamine

a central nervous system stimulant with marked α and β adrenoreceptor activity. Its use is strictly controlled and there are few applications in veterinary medicine. Called also benzedrine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Right after World War II, Sweden and Asia witnessed widespread amphetamine abuse, he says.
LEVELS of amphetamine abuse are more than five times higher in Ireland than other European countries
The court heard that the elder Mr Jobson had a history of cocaine and amphetamine abuse and had caused discord in the family by taking up with another woman soon after the death of his wife, Ethel, from cirrhosis in December 2001.
Employed people made up 48 percent of the admissions for alcohol abuse, 37 percent of the admissions of marijuana/hashish abuse, and nearly one-quarter of the admissions for heroin abuse, smoked-cocaine abuse, and methamphet-amine/ amphetamine abuse.
International Drug Control Program (UNDCP), with the cooperation of the Japanese Foreign and Health and Welfare ministries, will sponsor a meeting on countermeasures against amphetamine abuse, which is rising sharply in Asia, the official said.
The report said that the killing was precipitated by amphetamine abuse.
This tendency toward violence results from the chemically induced paranoia that attends amphetamine abuse and makes the abuser completely unpredictable.
Mr Rowen said: "In the EU, Ireland is number one for amphetamine abuse, number one for ecstasy abuse and third for cocaine abuse.
YOUNG Irish people have the highest level of cannabis, ecstasy and amphetamine abuse in Europe, shocking figures revealed yesterday.