amide

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amide

 [am´īd]
any compound derived from ammonia by substitution of an acyl radical for hydrogen, or from an acid by replacing the -OH group by -NH2.

am·ide

, primary amidesecondary amidetertiary amide (am'īd, am'id),
A substance derived from ammonia by replacing hydrogen atoms with acyl groups, R-CO-NH2. Replacement of one hydrogen atom results in formation of a primary amide; of two hydrogen atoms, a secondary amide; and of three hdyrogen atoms, a tertiary amide. Amides can also be derived from a carboxylic acid by replacing a carboxylic OH with NH2 from a carboxylic acid by replacement of a carboxylic OH by NH2. Replacement of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amide; that of two hydrogen atoms, a secondary amide; and that of three atoms, a tertiary amide.

amide

/am·ide/ (am´īd) any compound derived from ammonia by substitution of an acid radical for hydrogen, or from an acid by replacing the sbondOH group by sbondNH2.

amide

(ăm′īd′, -ĭd)
n.
1. An organic compound, such as acetamide, containing the CONH2 group.
2. The anion of ammonia, NH2- or a compound containing this anion, such as sodium amide, NaNH2.

a·mid′ic (ə-mĭd′ĭk, ă-mĭd′-) adj.

amide

1 a chemical compound formed from an organic acid by the substitution of an amino (NH2, NHR, or NR2) group for the hydroxyl of a carboxyl (COOH) group.
2 a chemical compound formed by the deprotonation of ammonia (NH3) or a primary (RNH2) or secondary (R2NH) amine.

am·ide

(am'īd)
A substance formally derived from ammonia through the substitution of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by acyl groups, R-CO-NH2, or from a carboxylic acid by replacement of a carboxylic OH by NH2. Replacement of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amide; that of two hydrogen atoms, a secondary amide; and that of three atoms, a tertiary amide.

amide

a compound formed from ammonia in which one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by a metal or acid radical.

am·ide

(am'īd)
A substance formally derived from ammonia through the substitution of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by acyl groups, R-CO-NH2, or from a carboxylic acid by replacement of a carboxylic OH by NH2.

amide (am´īd),

n 1. an ammonia-derived organic compound formed through the displacement of a hydrogen atom by an acyl radical.
2. An ammonia-derived inorganic compound formed through the replacement of an acid's hydroxyl group (OH) with that of an amino group such as NH2.
3. type of local anesthetic agent. See also anesthetic, amide.

amide

any compound derived from ammonia by substitution of an acid radical for hydrogen, or from an acid by replacing the −OH group by −NH2.

amide compound herbicides
diphenamid and CDAA may cause poisoning if given in large doses. Signs include depression, weight loss and muscular weakness of the hindquarters.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the swelling and lumping reduces the overall surface of the granules, the amidation was slowed down.
This is necessary to exclude any interactions of possible amidation that may disturb the measurements from FT-IR spectra, TGA, and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) thermograms.
As mentioned earlier, various catalysts were tested, in the hope that they would favor the amidation and suppress the methylation.
4c), uneven, and wrapped by polymer chains that are several nanometers thick; this wrapping is indicative of the amidation of the MWCNTs [27],
The in situ amidation of aqueous ammonia NMSO upon curing was only evident among the trisubstituted soybean oil triglycerides (230 mg KOH/g), and not MSO-2 (156 mg KOH/g).
In addition, there are several protein kinase C (PS00005) and casein kinase II (PS00006) phosphorylation sites and N-myristoylation sites (PS00008), one amidation site (PS00009), one cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site (PS00004) in porcine GLUT2 sequence.
The amidation of the carboxy terminus has been reported to protect against carboxypeptidases (26), and exoprotease resistance was characteristic to designated "second-generation" reporter peptides (Table 1).
Several technologies are available to manufacture biodiesel, such as transesterification, amidation with diethylamine, catalyzing pyrolysis, and transesterification in supercritical methanol.
GLP-1 is produced as an inactive 37-amino acid peptide whose C-terminal contains glycine, by post-translational cleavage of six amino acids from the N-terminal of GLP-1 (1-37) to form the amidated form as GLP-1 (7-37) which conserves the C-terminal of the glycine to produce another amidation at position 37 leads to production of GLP-1 (7-36) NH2, the major circulating form, however GLP-1 (7-37) and GLP1 (7-36) both have identical biological properties as incretins [7,19,20].