slang

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slang

Sociology A specialized lexicon of words that are exclusive or replace other words in function, and tend to have a short life cycle. Cf Dialect, Jargon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alongside publication of letters that used this type of language, The Australian Women's Weekly even published lists of American slang terms from time to time, which aimed to provide teenagers with the most up-to-date terminology (The Australian Women's Weekly, November 17, 1954; July 3, 1957).
On balance, though, KYBO is more likely to be American slang, particularly originating from the outhouses at scout and Farm & Wilderness camps in Vermont and Iowa 'in the old days'.
Keywords: semantic change, figuration, semantic shifting, American slang
Pakistani sources said Saifullah, whose location is unknown, had spent time in the United States and is familiar with American slang and idioms.
If Rent-a-Clunker's very first car actually was a clunker (which, by the way, is North American slang for a dilapidated vehicle), why wasn't I a speck on the horizon in a shiny sedan from Kurt's Rent-a-Car?
For one thing, I never saw "Tchyeah" spelled out, and it should become part of any new publication of American slang dictionaries.
SECTION8is common American slang for "crazy", based on the US military, who discharge mentally unfit personnel under Section8of thier regulations.
Sometimes we stumbled over the author's use of African American slang.
Muldoon mimics American slang and mixes it with literary allusions in a hash of colorful, unquotable pastiche, full of verbal echoes, a series of non sequiturs without beginning, middle, or end.
This week I have suffered tension headaches and sleepless nights, and on Wednesday I rang work and booked a duvet day - even though the American slang for an impromptu day off was completely off the mark.
A birdie, one under par, appears to have originated from American slang, a 'bird' meaning anything excellent or wonderful.
American slang and that country's idiomatic use of English have been creeping across the Pond for years, particularly since the talking pictures arrived, and accelerated when authors such as Raymond Chandler were published here.

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