American rattlesnake

American rattlesnake

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According to the study by Indiana University researchers, which focuses on North American rattlesnakes, rate of future change in suitable habitat will be two to three orders of magnitude greater than the average change over the past 300 millennia, a time that included three major glacial cycles and significant variation in climate and temperature.
basiliscus is similar to that of other North American rattlesnakes in that spermatozoan formation occurs during late summer and autumn (Aldridge & Brown 1995; Goldberg 1999a; 1999b; 1999c; 2000a; 2000b; 2000c; 2002; 2004; Goldberg & Beaman 2003a,; 2003b; Goldberg & Holycross 1999; Goldberg & Rosen 2000; Holycross & Goldberg 2001; Rosen & Goldberg 2002).
This occurs in other southwestern North American rattlesnakes where production of young appears related to abundance of food, resulting in a less-than-annual reproductive cycle (Goldberg & Rosen 2000; Rosen & Goldberg 2002; Taylor & DeNardo 2005).
The reproductive cycle of this species is compared with that of other North American rattlesnakes.
enyo is similar to that of other North American rattlesnakes in which sperm formation occurs summer-autumn and is stored over winter in the vasa deferentia (see Goldberg 1999a,b,c, 2000a,b,c; Goldberg and Holycross 1999; Goldberg and Rosen 2000; Holycross and Goldberg 2001).
Another scientist has spent a lot of time in the Arizona mountains studying diamondbacks, the largest of North American rattlesnakes.
In Europe and Asia, American rattlesnakes are a coveted commodity among collectors.
Timing of this cycle is similar to that of other North American rattlesnakes.
cerastes has a testicular cycle similar to those of other North American rattlesnakes in which sperm formation occurs during this period (Aldridge 1979b; Aldridge & Brown 1995; Goldberg 1999a, 1999b, 1999c, 2000a, 2000b, 2000c, 2002; Goldberg & Holycross 1999; Goldberg & Rosen 2000; Holycross & Goldberg 2001; Goldberg & Beaman 2003).
Crotalus mitchellii appears to follow a biennial reproductive cycle in which yolk deposition (secondary vitellogenesis sensu Aldridge 1979b) commences in summer followed by ovulation the next year which is similar to that reported in other North American rattlesnakes (see Goldberg, 1999).
This also occurs in other North American rattlesnakes (Goldberg 1999a; 1999b; 1999c; 2000a).
Timing of this cycle is similar to that of several other North American rattlesnakes.

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