oyster

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oyster

(oi′stər)
n.
a. Any of several edible bivalve mollusks of the family Ostreidae, having a rough, irregularly shaped shell attached to the substrate in shallow marine waters. Oysters are widely cultivated for food.
b. Any of various similar or related bivalve mollusks, such as the pearl oyster.
intr.v. oys·tered, oys·tering, oys·ters
To gather, dredge for, or raise oysters.
A bivalved mollusc which may be consumed raw or cooked
Health benefits Oysters are a natural source of iron, zinc and selenium, as well as vitamin B12

oyster

[AS. oistre]
A shellfish that, when eaten raw or only partially cooked, may be a source of hepatitis A virus and bacterial pathogens. See: diarrhea, travelers'

oyster

References in periodicals archive ?
Hare MP, Avise JC (1998) Population structure in the American oyster as Inferred by nuclear gene genealogies.
Declining phytoplankton stocks and the population dynamics of American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) populations.
In the American oyster, most individuals are male at the first breeding season, but the proportion of females increases thereafter, passing equality at two to three years and resulting in an excess of females in the oldest oysters (Coe 1932; Galtsoff 1964; Mackie 1984).
Although various artisanal fisheries worldwide have employed free diving as a fishing technique and some modern fisheries, including the American oyster fishery, involve the use of scuba, diving is not a skill possessed by most oyster fishermen and probably is not a method under consideration for oyster fishing in general.
Protective role of alginic acid against metal uptake by American Oyster (Crassostrea virginica).
Analysis of microgrowth patterns of the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) in the middle Atlantic region of North America: archaeological applications.
Endemic disease of cultured shellfish of Long Island, New York: adult and juvenile American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and hard clams (Mercenaria mereenaria).
Effects of repeated shell damage to gametogenesis in the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin).
Habitat suitability index models: Gulf of Mexico American oyster.
In a similar study, the American oyster Crasssostrea virginica was found to display a similar pattern of most successful recruitment to its native habitat in fall (Roegner & Mann 1995).
Energy partitioning in the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin).

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