American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists


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American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)

a national organization of obstetricians and gynecologists.
References in periodicals archive ?
The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) offers the following pamphlets, Hormone Replacement Therapy, Preventing Osteoporosis, and The Menopause Years.
From the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (AGOG) come the answers to these commonly asked questions about HRT and the WHI study: (10)
The law was also endorsed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the California Pharmacy Association and the California Medical Association.
While the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists had no comment on the rule, a May 2001 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists committee opinion stares that optimal goals for anesthesia care in obstetrics include the "appointment of a qualified anesthesiologist to be responsible for all anesthetics administered.
A research team from Our Lady of Mercy Medical Center in New York followed a group of smoking and nonsmoking women through their pregnancies and reported its findings last week in San Francisco at the annual meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
Rosenblatt is a fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and an active member of several other organizations.
professionals in non-reproductive health specialties have published information or guidelines on mifepristone use, and only one provider belonged to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the National Abortion Federation or Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health.
Griffin, director of program services for the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
The use of this form of progesterone is recommended by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) in the treatment of women for recurrent preterm birth.
Efforts to deregulate emergency contraception received a major boost when the American Medical Association in late 2000 and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) in early 2001 approved resolutions supporting over-the-counter status for the method.
Worried that too many women still are unaware of the availability of emergency contraception or ``morning after'' pills, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and other health groups have announced an initiative to educate patients and their doctors about this method of preventing an unplanned pregnancy.
Wagner reported the results in San Francisco this week at an American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists meeting.
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