ambon

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ambon

 [am´bon]
the fibrocartilaginous edge of the socket in which the head of a long bone is lodged.

ambon

/am·bon/ (am´bon) the fibrocartilaginous ring forming the edge of the socket in which the head of a long bone is lodged.

ambon

An obsolete term that formerly dignified the fibrocartilaginous ring attached to articular sockets of long bones, e.g., labrum acetabulare and the labrum glenoidale.

ambon

the fibrocartilaginous edge of the socket in which the head of a long bone is lodged.
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References in periodicals archive ?
There is the possibility that the Indonesian government will lose its legitimacy to negotiate a resolution and the conflict will become a separatist war between Christian Ambonese and the Indonesian government.
Witnesses said three of the dead were Ambonese Catholics killed by a mob after they were seen beating a Javanese Moslem to death.
We see communities such as the Ambonese and Karens used by colonial powers and led to believe that their rights would be protected, only to be abandoned in the end.
This was evident when, eight weeks after his arrival, he married a Eurasian woman, Sara Timmerman, who belonged to an influential Ambonese family.
35) Kam also started a missions prayer meeting in Ambon for Europeans and Ambonese, where they collected money for mission work in South Africa.
In the Indonesian case, analyzing the consequences of its national model and corresponding institutions allowed for the differentiation of sources of tensions for groups as different as the Acehnese, the Ambonese Christians, and the Dayaks.
At first the Muslim students checked the identification of Ambonese Christians but later imposed the check on all Christian students, they said.
She said the chaos in Ambon stems from cultural friction between the native Ambonese and people who have migrated from nearby islands.
The character Wing, played by Pauline Chan, is based on Nellie, an Ambonese woman, who was the main trader in the camp.
Together the chapters by Franz von Benda-Beckmann & Tanja Taale, Arie Brouwer, and Keebet von Benda-Beckmann provide a highly detailed impression of the complexities of land ownership, of the system of land and resource management, and of the strategies of co-operation and social care pursued in an Ambonese village.
The strife was triggered by a brawl between local Javanese Muslims and a gang of young Christian men of the Ambonese ethnic group from Moluccas Island, over a games hall, Maj.