tolerance

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tolerance

 [tol´er-ans]
1. the ability to bear something potentially difficult.
2. the ability to endure unusually large doses of a poison or toxin.
3. drug tolerance. adj., adj tol´erant.
acquired drug tolerance drug tolerance.
ambiguity tolerance the ability to withstand conflicting or complex situations without undue psychological stress.
drug tolerance a decreasing response to repeated constant doses of a drug or the need for increasing doses to maintain a constant response. See also drug dependence and habituation.
immunologic tolerance specific nonreactivity of lymphoid tissues to a particular antigen capable under other conditions of inducing immunity.
standing tolerance the amount of time an individual is capable of maintaining an erect, upright position.
tolerance test
1. an exercise test to determine the efficiency of the circulation.
2. a test to determine the body's ability to metabolize a substance or to endure administration of a drug.

tol·er·ance

(tol'ĕr-ăns),
1. The ability to endure or be less responsive to a stimulus, especially over a period of continued exposure.
2. The power of resisting the action of a poison or of taking a drug continuously or in large doses without injurious effects.
[L. tolero, pp. -atus, to endure]

tolerance

/tol·er·ance/ (tol´er-ans)
1. diminution of response to a stimulus after prolonged exposure.
2. the ability to endure unusually large doses of a poison or toxin.
4. immunologic t.tol´erant

drug tolerance  decrease in susceptibility to the effects of a drug due to its continued administration.
immunologic tolerance  the development of specific nonreactivity of lymphoid tissues to a particular antigen capable under other conditions of inducing immunity, resulting from previous contact with the antigen and having no effect on the response to non–cross-reacting antigens.
impaired glucose tolerance  (IGT) a term denoting values of fasting plasma glucose or results of an oral glucose tolerance test that are abnormal but not high enough to be diagnostic of diabetes mellitus.

tolerance

(tŏl′ər-əns)
n.
1.
a. Physiological resistance to a toxin.
b. Diminution in the physiological response to a drug that occurs after continued use, necessitating larger doses to produce a given response.
c. The ability to digest or metabolize a food, drug, or other substance or compound: glucose tolerance.
2.
a. Acceptance of a tissue graft or transplant without immunological rejection.
b. Unresponsiveness to an antigen that normally produces an immunologic reaction.
3. The ability of an organism to resist or survive infection by a parasitic or pathogenic organism.

tolerance

[tol′ərəns]
Etymology: L, tolerare, to endure
a phenomenon by which the body becomes increasingly resistant to a drug or other substance through continued exposure to the substance. A kind of tolerance is work tolerance.

tolerance

Immunology Immune unresponsiveness to an antigenic challenge. See Immune tolerance, Self-tolerance Pharmacology An ↑ in dose of a drug required to achieve the same effect in a particular Pt, which is a function of ↑ metabolism–eg, by hypertrophy of the endoplasmic reticulum or ↑ expulsion of the drug from a cell–eg, amplification of the multidrug resistant gene by malignant cells. See Oral tolerance, MDR Psychiatry Resistance to the effects of a sedative Substance abuse
1. A state caused by regular use of opioids, where an increased dose is needed to produce the desired effect; tolerance may be a predictable sequelae of opioid use and does not imply addiction. See Drug tolerance, Physical dependence.
2. The ability to 'hold liquor'–consume alcohol without overt signs of inebriation Vox populi A general term for a person's general 'mellowness,' which encompasses the ability to cope with stress, acceptance of others, complete with bumps and flaws, and other facets of social intelligence.

tol·er·ance

(tol'ĕr-ăns)
1. The ability to endure or be less responsive to a stimulus, especially over a period of continued exposure.
2. The power of resisting the action of a poison or of taking a drug continuously or in large doses without injurious effects.
[L. tolero, pp. -atus, to endure]

tolerance

  1. the ability of an organism to withstand harsh environmental pressures such as drought or extreme temperatures.
  2. the ability of an organism to withstand the build up of an adverse factor such as pesticides or endoparasites within itself without showing serious symptoms of attack.

Tolerance

A phenomenon whereby a drug user becomes physically accustomed to a particular dose of a substance, and requires increasing dosages in order to obtain the same effects.

tolerance

tendency over time to become less responsive to a constant stimulus; e.g. tendency for same drug dose to cause less effect with repeated administration over time, so that a larger dose is required to achieve the same degree of therapeutic effect

tolerance,

n a gradual decrease in the patient's response to a medicine over time; necessitates increasing the dosage to achieve the same results. See also reactivity and sensitivity.

tol·er·ance

(tol'ĕr-ăns)
1. Ability to endure or be less responsive to a stimulus, especially over a period of continued exposure.
2. Power of resisting the action of a poison or of taking a drug continuously or in large doses without harm.
[L. tolero, pp. -atus, to endure]

tolerance (tol´ərəns),

n the ability to endure the influence of a drug or poison, particularly acquired by continued use of the substance. See also resistance.
tolerance, acquired,
n tolerance that develops with successive doses of a drug. If it develops within a short span of time, such as 24 hours, it is called
tachyphylaxis. Slowly acquired tolerance is sometimes called
mithridatism.
tolerance, carbohydrate,
n the ability of the body to use carbohydrates. A decrease in tolerance is seen in diabetes mellitus, liver damage, and some infections and in the presence of hyperactivity of the adrenal cortex or pituitary gland.
tolerance, cross,
n tolerance to a number of drugs of similar mode of action or chemical structure.
tolerance, individual,
n tolerance characteristic of an individual.
tolerance, pseudo-,
n a state of apparent tolerance indicated due to failure of the drug to reach its usual receptor sites.
tolerance, species,
n tolerance characteristic of a species of animal.
tolerance, tissue,
n the ability of structures to endure environmental change without ill effect.
tolerance, upper intake level,
n the specified limit of a given substance that an individual may consume and not suffer detrimental or toxic effects.

tolerance

the ability to endure without effect or injury.

drug tolerance
1. decreased susceptibility to the effects of a drug due to its continued administration.
2. the maximum permissible level of a drug in or on animal feed or food at any particular time relative to slaughter.
high-dose tolerance
in immunology, that induced by the intravenous administration of high doses of aqueous proteins.
immunological tolerance
specific nonreactivity of the immune system to a particular antigen, which is capable under other conditions of inducing an immune response. There is, under normal circumstances, tolerance to self-antigens; identical (monozygotic) twins and dizygotic cattle or sheep twins where there has been placental fusion and exchange of bone marrow stem cells are also tolerant of each other's tissues. Allophenic mice, that is mice produced by fusion of blastocysts from different mice are also tolerant of both 'parents'. The administration of antigens either at high or low dose and infection with certain viruses during critical early stages of immunological development may also induce tolerance.
tolerance level
the concentration of a drug or chemical permitted by law to be present in human food.
tolerance limits
the numerical limits within which a previously identified proportion of values of a variable, or observations in a population, can be expected to occur.
low-dose tolerance
that induced by repeated administration of low doses of the antigen.
oral tolerance
that induced by oral administration of the antigen.
self-tolerance
the non-reactivity of the immune system to self-antigens.
tolerance test
see tolerance test.
zero tolerance
when no detectable amount of a chemical substance is permitted in human food.

Patient discussion about tolerance

Q. When will I have the Glucose Tolerance Test? I am pregnant and wanted to know when I need to have the Glucose Tolerance Test and what is the test like.

A. The test is given between week 24 and week 28 of the pregnancy. First you drink glucose, which is very sweet. You can mix it will water to help it go down easier. Then, after an hour you will have a blood test to check your glucose levels.

Q. What Do my Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Results Mean? I had an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test last week. I am 26 weeks pregnant. The results I got are 132 mg/dL. What does this mean?

A. If your blood glucose level was greater than 130 mg/dL, your provider will likely recommend you take another diabetes screening test that requires you to fast (not eat anything) before the test. During this second test, called the 100-gram oral glucose tolerance test, your blood glucose level will be tested four times during a three-hour period after drinking the cola-like drink. If two out of the four blood tests are abnormal, you are considered to have gestational diabetes.

Q. I want to know the types of therapy to treat Bipolar Disorder. My aunty is suffering from Bipolar disorder. I couldn’t tolerate her suffering. So I want to know the types of therapy to treat this?

More discussions about tolerance
References in periodicals archive ?
English as first language) could give people higher levels of confidence, competence, and motivation to engage in intercultural communication as well as a higher level of ambiguity tolerance in intercultural encounters.
Second, to explore the psychological factor of ambiguity tolerance, which has been proposed to contribute to precognitive dream experiences (Blackmore & Moore, 1994), it was hypothesized that there would be a negative correlation between ambiguity tolerance and the participants' target clip similarity ratings.
4) It is proposed to raise ambiguity tolerance encourage them to think of different ideas and encouraged them to express their opinions.
2002), (d) four items of the general ambiguity tolerance scale (McLain, 1993), and (e) six items of the problem-specific ambiguity tolerance scale (Ashford and Cummings, 1985).
Using Norton's Measure of Ambiguity Tolerance (MAT-50) instrument, this study examines the TFA construct in the context of school leadership by sampling a large group of aspiring and practicing school leaders.
The question of whether homogeneity of demographics in the workplace could play a role in explaining the higher levels of ambiguity tolerance and its accompanying high levels of adaptability in the Indian group than in the Fijian group is also a consideration.
Brainstorming groups: Ambiguity tolerance, communication apprehension, task attraction, and individual productivity.
Although tolerance for ambiguity has been highlighted as important in the development of creative, integrative thinking in the college setting, few studies have examined ambiguity tolerance and anxiety in response to uncertainties introduced in the classroom.