amaranth

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Related to Amaranths: Amaranthus spinosus, Amaranthus cruentus, Amaranthus hybridus, Amaranthus viridis

am·a·ranth

, amaranthum (am'ă-ranth, am-ă-ran'thŭm), [C.I. 16185]
An azo dye; a soluble reddish-brown powder that turns magenta red in solution; used as a food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic coloring agent, and occasionally in histology.
[G. amaranthon, a never-fading flower]

am·a·ranth

(am'ă-ranth)
A weed (Amaranthus) of widespread geographic distribution; some species are consumed as a foodstuff; its prolific ability to produce seed allows its use as a flour. Purported value both internally and externally (e.g., astringent).
Synonym(s): love-lies-bleeding, red cockscomb.
[G. amaranthon, a never-fading flower]
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies conducted in Kenya [5, 6] show that amaranth grain has a good level of iron and other nutrients and may, therefore, be a choice to use for complementary food formulation at the household level to address widespread micronutrient deficiencies.
This research therefore initiated an examination of the potential use of amaranth grain in complementary foods to address the low micronutrient intake of children in a rural area of Ethiopia.
1] expressed that early planting date increased amaranth leaf area duration and water absorption during the critical period be tween flower bud appearances to flowering.
Therefore, the aim of this research was evaluation of product development possibility of Amaranth Tabriz climate.
Amaranths produce many thousands of tiny seeds having very valuable contents.
Complex exploitation of amaranth mass uses the rest of the herb after removing leafs and seeds is in the research.
The samples are being conserved as part of a comprehensive collection of amaranth germplasm maintained in the National Plant Germplasm System.
Grain amaranth is a relatively new food crop in Uganda.
Consumption of grain amaranth has been reported to have nutritional and health benefits, ranging from a general improvement in well-being to prevention and improvement of specific ailments and symptoms including recovery of severely malnourished children and an increase in the body mass index of people formerly wasted by HIV/AIDS [7,8].
Amaranth grain has high protein, as well as a high fat content; there is the potential to use it as an energy food.
The amaranth seed is becoming a versatile cash crop in Eastern Africa and could provide a good source of income for underprivileged families [5].
The potential of both grain and vegetable amaranth as a food resource has been reviewed extensively by many researchers [2].