Amanita

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Amanita

 [am″ah-ni´tah]
a genus of mushrooms, several species of which are poisonous. A. phalloi´des, the destroying angel or death cup, and the similar species A. ver´na and A. viro´sa produce a hemolysin and a mixture of peptide toxins such as phalloidin that cause irreversible damage to cardiac muscle, liver, and kidney cells. Symptoms are often delayed from six to 20 hours, and mortality ranges from 50 to 90 per cent. A. musca´ria, fly agaric, causes a drunkenlike intoxication and loss of consciousness but is rarely fatal. Initial signs of toxicity mimic those of parasympathetic stimulation and can be treated with atropine.

Amanita

(am-ă-nī'tă),
A genus of fungi; many varieties are highly poisonous.
[G. amanitai, fungi]

Amanita

/Am·a·ni·ta/ (am″ah-ni´tah) a genus of poisonous mushrooms; ingestion of A. phalloi´des, A. musca´ria, A. pantheri´na, A. ver´na, and others causes poisoning manifested by vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, followed by a period of improvement, and culminating in signs of severe hepatic, renal, and central nervous system damage. Most fatalities are due to A. phalloides.

Amanita

Etymology: Gk, amanitai, fungus
a genus of mushrooms. Some species, such as Amanita phalloides, are poisonous, causing hallucinations, GI upset, and pain that may be followed by liver, kidney, and central nervous system damage.

Am·a·ni·ta

(am'ă-nī'tă)
A genus of fungi, many members of which are highly poisonous.
[G. amanitai, fungi]

Amanita

A genus of mushrooms most of which are extremely poisonous. A common species is Amanita phalloides , so named because of its resemblance to a penis.

Amanita

a genus of macro fungi many of which can be poisonous to humans, less frequently to animals unless eaten in large quantities. Called also mushrooms. Include A. mappa, A. muscaria, A. pantherina, A. phalloides, A. verna, A. virosa. Contain hepatoxic peptides and hallucinogens.
References in periodicals archive ?
The frst assumption is that Amanita muscaria shares similar chemical properties with Psilocybe mushrooms, which allow it to be eaten fresh or dried without preparation.
While Wasson was unable to explain the significance of the second filter as applied to Amanita muscaria, this study seeks to illustrate how this step may provide further support for his theory.
While ibotenic acid, one of the mushrooms active constituents, passes in the urine unmetabolized, it is likely that other components of Amanita muscaria that contribute to nausea and vomiting, such as muscarine, have been metabolized (filtered) into inactive by-products.
Accounts of Amanita muscaria inebriation and poisonings were collected in order to analyze variations in the reports of nausea and vomiting, symptoms often associated with Amanita muscaria inebriation/poisoning, by style of preparation.
Over 600 accounts of inebriation and poisoning with either Amanita muscaria or Amanita pantherina 1 were compiled.
The anecdotal accounts of Amanita muscaria experiences described a variety of preparation types, including: (1) fresh/raw, (2) dried, (3) tea with solids consumed, (4) tea with solids removed, and (5) cooked.