Amanita phalloides


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Amanita phalloides: Amanita muscaria, Amanita ocreata

Am·a·ni·ta phal·loi·'des

a species of fungus containing poisonous elements, including phalloidin and amanitin, which cause gastroenteritis, hepatic necrosis, and renal necrosis.
Synonym(s): deadly agaric
A mushroom which, along with related species—A bisporigera, A verna, A virosa—is the most common cause of fatal mushroom poisonings
Mechanism The major toxins are amanatins, a series of closely related heat-stable cyclic octapeptides, which inhibit RNA polymerase in liver cells
Management Symptomatic-rehydration, IV glucose, instillation of 100 g of activated charcoal per os, mannitol to prevent oliguria; 50% of late-treated patients die

Amanita phalloides

Toxicology A mushroom which, with related species–A bisporigera, A verna, A virosa are the most common cause of fatal mushroom poisonings Clinical After a 12-hr latency, N&V, abdominal colic, severe watery diarrhea; this is followed by a 24-hr latency period, then–if the amount ingested was significant—by fatal hepatitis and renal failure Management Symptomatic-rehydration, IV glucose, instillation of 100 g of activated charcoal per os, mannitol to prevent oliguria; 50% of late-treated Pts die. See Poisonous mushroom.

Am·a·ni·ta phal·loi·des

(am'ă-nī'tă fă-loy'dēz)
A species of mushroom containing poisonous principles (including phalloidin and amanitin) that cause gastroenteritis, hepatic necrosis, and renal necrosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Demonstration and isolation of phallolysin, a haemolytic toxin from Amanita phalloides.
Pooled data from case record studies involving 452 patients with Amanita phalloides poisoning show a highly significant difference in mortality in favour of silibinin [the main isomer contained in silymarin] (mortality 9.
Amanita phalloides contains amanitin, inhibiting RNA polymerase II.
Management of maternal Amanita phalloides poisoning during the first trimester of pregnancy: a case report and review of the literature.
You're thinking of Amanita phalloides and Amanita verna, the Destroying Angels.
Amanita phalloides en sik neden olan mantar turu olup amatoksin ve falloidin olmak uzere iki farkli toksin uretirler.
The Medical ward was the place where we admitted most of our infectious disease victims, and it was fascinating to learn more about tropical diseases, along with some other exotic illnesses such as fatal poisoning with the Amanita Phalloides mushroom.
The hepatoprotective action of silymarin in fatal fulminant hepatic failure following Amanita phalloides mushroom poisoning is documented in experimental animals and humans even when given after exposure (Hruby et al.
Amanita phalloides is its Latin name and the fungus is common all over Europe.