amalgam

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Related to Amalgams: dental amalgam alloy

amalgam

 [ah-mal´gam]
an alloy of mercury with other metals; used in dental restorations.
 Varnish, liner, and base applications for use with dental amalgam that is not bonded to the cavity preparation walls. E, enamel; D, dentin. From Darby and Walsh, 1995.

a·mal·gam

(ă-mal'gam),
An alloy of an element or a metal with mercury. In dentistry, primarily of two types: silver-tin alloy, containing small amounts of copper, zinc and perhaps other metal;, and a second type containing more copper (12%-30% by weight); amalgams are used in restoring teeth and making dies.
[G. malagma, a soft mass]

amalgam

/amal·gam/ (ah-mal´gam) an alloy of two or more metals, one of which is mercury.

amalgam

(ə-măl′gəm)
n.
Any of various alloys of mercury with other metals, especially:
a. An alloy of mercury and silver used in dental fillings.
b. An alloy of mercury and tin used in silvering mirrors.

amalgam

[əmal′gəm]
Etymology: Gk, malagma, soft mass
1 a mixture or combination.
2 an alloy of mercury, silver, and other metals commonly used in dentistry.

amalgam

Dental amalgam Dentistry A silver-copper-tin alloy with varying amounts of mercury to fill carious teeth. See Biological dentistry, Cremation, Fluoridation, Mercury.

a·mal·gam

(ă-mal'găm)
An alloy of an element or a metal with mercury. In dentistry, primarily of two types: silver-tin alloy, containing small amounts of copper, zinc, and perhaps other metals, and a second type containing more copper (12-30% by weight); they are used in restoring teeth.
[G. malagma, a soft mass]

amalgam

A dental material consisting of powdered mercury, silver and tin which, when mixed, may be forced into a drilled and cleaned cavity in a tooth where it hardens within a few minutes. Surprisingly, in spite of occasional expressed concern, amalgam does not seem to present the risk of mercury poisoning.

Amalgam

A mixture (alloy) of silver and several other metals, used by dentists to make fillings for cavities.
Mentioned in: Tooth Decay

a·mal·gam

(ă-mal'găm)
An alloy of an element or a metal with mercury. In dentistry, primarily of two types: silver-tin alloy, containing small amounts of copper, zinc, and perhaps other metal, and a second type containing more copper (12-30% by weight); amalgams are used in restoring teeth and making dies.
Synonym(s): amalgam alloy, dental amalgam alloy.
[G. malagma, a soft mass]

amalgam (əmal´gəm),

n (dental amalgam alloy), an alloy, one of the constituents of which is mercury.
amalgam, bonded,
n 1. a composite of tooth-colored acrylic resin and finely ground glass-like particles that is bonded or adhered to the tooth during dental restoration. The advantage is that less of the tooth structure needs to be removed during the restoration, resulting in a smaller filling compared with traditional amalgams.
2. a composite filling.
amalgam carrier,
amalgam carver,
amalgam condenser,
amalgam, copper,
n an alloy composed principally of copper and mercury. See also amalgam.
amalgam, dental,
n an amalgam used for dental restorations and dyes.
amalgam matrix,
amalgam pigmentation,
n See amalgam tattoo.
amalgam plugger,
amalgam, silver,
n a dental amalgam, the main constituent of which is silver. The ADA composition specifications are as follows: silver, 65% minimum; tin, 25% minimum; copper, 6% maximum; zinc, 2% maximum.
amalgam squeeze cloth,
n a piece of linen used to hold plastic amalgam from which excess mercury is to be squeezed. Used with hand trituration.
amalgam tattoo,
n a solitary discrete gray, blue, or black discoloration of tissue usually located in the gingiva, alveolar ridge, or buccal mucosa caused by small amounts of dental amalgam that became embedded under the surface. The asymptomatic lesion is static and requires no treatment. If doubt exists about the lesion or if the lesion is unsightly, excisional biopsy is recommended.
Enlarge picture
Amalgam tattoo.
amalgam well,
n a small, bowl-shaped container that holds mixed amalgam prior to its being loaded into the amalgam carrier.

amalgam

a silver-tin-copper alloy in combination with mercury, commonly used in dental restoration.

amalgam burnisher
an instrument used to smooth the surface of an amalgam filling.
amalgam condenser, amalgam plugger
an instrument used to pack amalgam into a filling.
amalgam well
a small bowl used to hold amalgam until it is used in the restoration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although mercury contained in amalgam is thought to cause congenital defects, evidence suggests that the amount of mercury vapor released from amalgam restorations (1-3u) is far lower than the toxic level.
The mean values of thermal conductivity were obtained by four specimens of all amalgams are reported after seven days from the end of trituration as shown in Table (3).
Evidence supporting a link between dental amalgams and chronic illness, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and suicide.
Purpose of this review article is to compare and help a clinician to select the right restorative material from Amalgam and Composite resin; the two most commonly used direct restorative materials worldwide.
Dental amalgam has been the material of choice for restoring posterior teeth since its introduction more than 150 years ago in the practice of dentistry.
Mercury exposure and risks from dental amalgam in the US population, post-2000.
The safety of dental amalgam has been a topic scrutinized by the FDA during the past seven years.
These bans clearly indicate that amalgam is no longer needed.
Two of Anne's 13 amalgam fillings were removed but she became very ill.
1) Don't breathe deeply at the dentist's office when they expose you to amalgams, such as when they're removing an old filling.
The use of mercury-silver amalgams has expanded over the years, and, today, ten million new mercury-silver fillings are placed each year.