Alzheimer


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Related to Alzheimer: Alzheimer disease

Alz·hei·mer

(awltz'hī-mĕr),
Alois, German neurologist, 1864-1915. See: Alzheimer dementia, Alzheimer disease, Alzheimer sclerosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The medication is a potent brain-selective cholinesterase inhibitor for the symptomatic treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer Disease.
When a patient with Alzheimer Disease declines in any one of the three domains of the disease, meaning activities of daily living, global function, including behaviour and cognition, it has a major impact on the lives of the patient and his or her caregiver," said Dr.
Inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase, which is shown to be elevated in the brains of patients afflicted with Alzheimer Disease, has only recently been identified as a promising new strategy for the treatment of the disease.
Alzheimer care has been evolving over the past 25 years as a result of caregiver trial and error.
6% of nursing homes in 1996 had Alzheimer special care units; 55.
This suggests that these genetic variations alter the normal function of SORL1, resulting in Alzheimer disease.
An important aspect of their findings was that the association between Alzheimer disease and SORL1 was replicated in four distinct ethnic groups: North American and European Caucasians, African-Americans, Caribbean-Hispanics, and Arabs residing in Israel.
That evidence led us to wonder if the complement system, which is such a destructive system, could potentially be involved in the neurodegenerative events in the Alzheimer brain," says Steven A.
Indeed, to diagnose Alzheimer's, doctors today rely upon essentially the same behavioral and biological hallmarks described by Alzheimer himself more than 80 years ago: a progressive dementia including severe loss of memory; and the accumulation in brain tissue of protein deposits called amyloid plaques, recognizable only upon autopsy.
But daunting hurdles remain, according to Alzheimer researchers who gathered recently at the National Institutes of Health to pool their findings.
Haass is recipient of the Award of the Heidelberg Academy of Sciences, Award of the German Brain League, International Alois Alzheimer Award, Ernst Jung Prize for Medicine, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Award, and the Potamkin Award of the American Academy of Neurology.