aluminum

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aluminum

 (Al) [ah-loo´mĭ-num]
a chemical element, atomic number 13, atomic weight 26.982. (See Appendix 6.) It occurs naturally in many foods in low concentrations and is also present in many pharmaceuticals and drinking water. High levels in the body can be toxic; see aluminum poisoning.
aluminum acetate solution Burow's solution.
basic aluminum carbonate gel an aluminum hydroxide–aluminum carbonate gel, used as an antacid, for treatment of hyperphosphatemia in renal insufficiency, and to prevent phosphate urinary calculi.
aluminum chloride a topical astringent solution and antiperspirant.
aluminum chlorohydrate an antiperspirant; called also aluminum hydroxychloride.
aluminum hydroxide the hydroxide of aluminum, used as an antacid and phosphate binder; the official preparation is aluminum hydroxide gel.
aluminum hydroxide gel a preparation of aluminum hydroxide in suspension or dried form, used as an antacid in the treatment of peptic ulcer and gastric hyperacidity and as a phosphate binder in treatment of phosphate nephrolithiasis.
aluminum hydroxychloride aluminum chlorohydrate.
aluminum oxide Al2O3, occurring naturally as various minerals; used in the production of abrasives, refractories, ceramics, catalysts, to strengthen dental ceramics, and in chromatography.
aluminum phosphate gel a water suspension of aluminum phosphate and some flavoring agents; used as a gastric antacid, astringent, and soothing agent.
aluminum poisoning the toxic effects of high levels of aluminum or its compounds in the body. In the gastrointestinal tract aluminum inhibits absorption of electrolytes; inhalation of aluminum fumes may cause pulmonary fibrosis; and aluminum in the bloodstream may lead to serious neurological symptoms, such as in dialysis encephalopathy.
aluminum silicate the silicate salt of aluminum, found in nature in several different hydrated forms that have pharmaceutical or dental uses; see attapulgite, fuller's earth, and kaolin.
aluminum subacetate a compound used as an astringent, diluted with water.
aluminum sulfate a compound used as an astringent solution and antiperspirant.

a·lu·mi·num (Al),

(ă-lū'min-ŭm), Although this element is called aluminium throughout the rest of the world, the spelling aluminum was officially adopted for the U.S. by the American Chemical Society in 1925.
A white, silvery metal of very light weight; atomic no. 13, atomic wt. 26.981539. Many salts and compounds of aluminum are used in medicine and dentistry.
[L. alumen, alum]

aluminum

/alu·mi·num/ (Al) (ah-loo´mĭ-num) a chemical element, at. no. 13.
aluminum acetate  a salt prepared by the reaction of aluminum hydroxide and acetic acid; used in solution as an astringent.
basic aluminum carbonate  see under gel.
aluminum chloride  a topical astringent and anhidrotic.
aluminum chlorohydrate  the hydrate of aluminum chloride hydroxide, astringent and anhidrotic; used as an antiperspirant and as an anhidrotic in the treatment of hyperhidrosis.
aluminum hydroxide  Al(OH)3, used as an antacid, and as an adjuvant in adsorbed vaccines and toxoids; see also under gel.
aluminum oxide  Al2O3, occurring naturally as various minerals such as corundum; used in the production of abrasives, refractories, ceramics, catalysts, to strengthen dental ceramics, and in chromatography.
aluminum phosphate  an aluminum salt used as an adjuvant in adsorbed vaccines and toxoids, with calcium sulfate and sodium silicate in dental cements, and as an antacid.
aluminum subacetate  a basic acetate ester derivative used topically as an astringent.
aluminum sulfate  an astringent, used topically as a local antiperspirant; also used in the preparation of aluminum subacetate topical solution.

aluminum (Al)

[əlo̅o̅′minəm]
Etymology: L, alumen, alum
a widely used metallic element and the third most abundant of all the elements. Its atomic number is 13; its atomic mass is 26.97. It occurs in the ores feldspar, mica, and kaolin but most abundantly in bauxite. Aluminum is commonly obtained by purifying bauxite to produce alumina, which is reduced to aluminum. It is light and durable and used extensively in the manufacture of aircraft components, prostheses, and dental appliances. Its compounds are components of many antacids, antiseptics, and astringents. Aluminum salts, such as aluminum hydroxychloride, can cause allergic reactions in susceptible individuals. Aluminum hydroxychloride is the most commonly used agent in antiperspirants and is also effective as a deodorant.

aluminium

A metallic element (atomic number 13; atomic weight 26.98) which may cause low levels of intoxication.

Toxicology
Changes of aluminium toxicity include vitamin D-refractory osteodystrophy with impaired mineralisation, decreased bone formation, hypercalcaemia, anaemia, progressive encephalopathy, dementia (the data on aluminium and dementia are controversial).
 
Management
Chelation with deferroxamine.

aluminum

Aluminium A metallic element–atomic number 13; atomic weight 26.98 Toxicology Changes of aluminum toxicity include vitamin D-refractory osteodystrophy with ↓ mineralization, ↓ bone formation, hypercalcemia, anemia, progressive encephalopathy, dementia Management Chelation with deferroxamine

a·lu·mi·num

(Al) (ă-lū'min-ŭm)
A white silvery metal of very light weight; atomic no. 13, atomic wt. 26.981539. Many salts and compounds are used in medicine and dentistry.
[L. alumen, alum]

aluminum,

n toxic metal sometimes found in drinking water, medications, and cookware.

a·lu·mi·num

(ă-lū'min-ŭm)
Light, white, silvery metal widely used in dentistry and other branches of health care.
[L. alumen, alum]

aluminum,

n a widely used metallic element and the third most abundant of all the elements. Aluminum is a principal component of many compounds used in antacids, antiseptics, astringents, and styptics. Aluminum hydroxychloride is the most commonly used agent in antiperspirants.

aluminum

a chemical element, atomic number 13, atomic weight 26.982, symbol Al. See Table 6.

aluminum acetate
a preparation of aluminum subacetate and glacial acetic acid, used for its antiseptic and astringent action on the skin. Called also Burow's solution.
aluminum binding agents
usually includes aluminum carbonate and hydroxide. See phosphate binders.
aluminum chloride
a deliquescent, crystalline powder used topically as an astringent solution and antiperspirant.
aluminum equivalent
a radiological measurement expressing the thickness of aluminum that produces the same attenuation of the x-ray beam as the thickness of the material being examined.
aluminum factory
prime source of fluorine pollution of pasture.
aluminum filter
inserted in the window of x-ray tubes to filter out x-rays of long wavelength; reduces potentially harmful and unnecessary radiation.
aluminum hydroxide, aluminum phosphate
aluminum preparations, available in suspension, as a gel, or in dried form, used as an antacid in the treatment of peptic ulcer in humans and gastric hyperacidity and in phosphate binders.
aluminum poisoning
pollution of pasture occurs from dust from factories handling aluminum products and in acid rain near such industrial works; contributes to nutritional deficiency of phosphorus by interfering with phosphorus absorption. Bodies of water which receive drainage from soils rich in aluminum may experience fish kills in circumstances in which the amount of aluminum is increased.
aluminum sulfate
see alum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aluminum chlorohydrate can also be used in a gel formula.
Selph recently launched Dreamy deodorant, a light liquid deodorant that replaces aluminum chlorohydrate and alcohol ingredients with a mild antibacterial agent and lavender oil to keep the skin fresh and scented throughout the day.
Robert Tapper, Los Angeles, has earned a patent for underarm pads which contain aluminum electrodes and a sponge dosed with aluminum chlorohydrate or aluminum zirconium.