altruism

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Related to Altruists: unselfishness, altruism

altruism

[al′tro̅o̅·iz′əm]
a sense of unconditional concern for the welfare of others. It may be expressed at the level of the individual, the group, or the larger social system. It is one of the curative factors of participating in group therapy. altruistic, adj.

altruism

(al′troo-ĭz-ĭm) [Fr. altruisme]
Acting for the benefit of others regardless of the consequences for oneself.

involuntary altruism

An action that is taken on behalf of others not because of one's own choosing but because of coercion, fiat, or legislation.
altruist (al′troo-ist″) altruistic (al″troo-is′tik)

altruism

Behaviour manifesting unselfish concern for the advantage of others. Much seemingly altruistic behaviour can be shown, on analysis, not to be so, and there are those who hold that altruism is a myth. Most social scientists, however, accept the concept.
References in periodicals archive ?
Without bias or re-composition, even though collectives with more altruists have higher fitness, all selection is happening at the particle level and altruists will die out.
However, unlike altruists, cooperation among impact philanthropists can decrease giving because in its absence, philanthropists fail to account for a negative gift externality.
It is not necessary to assume that effectuators cue in altruism (intelligent or otherwise) in others effectuators need not take on the cognitive costs of finding others who think like them or analyzing whether others are "intelligent altruists.
The experiences of such people seem to refute the view that altruists get satisfaction from choosing to do good.
Table 4 estimates two Tobit models: one for the egoists in the dictator game and a second for the altruists.
In this epistemological darkness, altruists have little option but to pursue the ends that they consider to be most important.
A key consequence of Becker's model is that due to the existence of an altruist in the family, the selfish members of the family act as if they were altruists themselves.
31) She conceptualized behavior along a continuum, with pure altruism at one extreme and pure self-interest at the other, and defined true altruists as those who placed themselves and families at risk over a period of time to help others in ways that offered little or no possibility of reward.
Nevertheless, Vista is mostly being rated as "hot", on the blogosphere and those who say it's not are usually Apple users or penguin-loving altruists of the open source world of Linux.
In churches all over the world are reminders of martyrs and saints, scientists, altruists, doctors and nurses.
The altruists who tirelessly volunteer to make the world a better place were given a moment to shine recently.
In fact, I have argued that the same kind of competitive market processes that underlie the conclusions of elementary economic theory can be expected even in an imaginary society peopled only by altruists.