Gibson

(redirected from Althea Gibson)
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Gib·son

(gib'sŏn),
Kasson C., U.S. dentist, 1849-1925. See: Gibson bandage.

Gib·son

(gib'sŏn),
George A., Scottish physician, 1854-1913. See: Gibson murmur.
References in periodicals archive ?
30, 2013 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- In 1957, Althea Gibson became the first African American tennis player to win the US Open, the same tournament that just a few years earlier prohibited her from playing because of her color.
ALTHEA GIBSON won the Ladies Championship in 1957 and 1958 before playing Lukey in the 1959 John Wayne Western.
Arthur Ashe and Althea Gibson survived being black to reach the pinnacles of a sport not renowned for progressive views.
Born to parents of Ethiopian, West Indian, American Indian and Caucasian descent, Brathwaite grew up in a mixed-race area of New York City known as Lower Washington Heights - where the gifted child played handball with future tennis great Althea Gibson and stickball with future baseball Hall-of-Famer Willie Mays.
She beat Davenport in the final on the Centre Court, becoming the first African-American to capture the title since Althea Gibson in 1958.
Williams became the first black women's champion at Wimbledon since Althea Gibson, who won the title in 1957 and 1958.
Venus has the weight of history on her powerful shoulders in following the black traditions of Althea Gibson and Zena Garrison.
Athletes such as Jackie Robinson and Althea Gibson persevered while breaking the color barrier and competing at the highest levels of sports.
But they may not know the path was blazed for them over 50 years ago, when Althea Gibson became the first African-American to compete in the U.
Djata discusses the founding of the American Tennis Association, players at the Tuskegee Institute, racism, the increase of players in the 1980s, USTA minority participation, and players Althea Gibson, Arthur Ashe, Zina Garrison, John Wilkerson, Lori McNeil, Chanda Rubin, MaliVai Washington, Steve Campbell, Venus and Serena Williams, Alexandra Stevenson, and James Blake.
Althea Gibson believed that records were meant to be broken, but it took four decades for another black tennis player to catch up to her back-to-back national and international championships.
However, the first black person--male or female--to actually win at Wimbledon was Althea Gibson, who won both the singles and doubles titles at Wimbledon in 1957 and 1958, respectively.