alter ego

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al·ter ego

Another side of oneself; a second self.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Under Armour Alter Ego line taps into the transformative strength and inspiration of DC Comics Super Heroes including Superman, Batman, The Flash, Wonder Woman and others to create a collection of athletic performance wear that inspires athletes to soar to new heights.
Consumer Products and the resulting Alter Ego collection has exceeded our expectations, and we look forward to expanding this concept, as well as our long-term partnership.
The lower court had upheld all but five of the interrogatories, stating that they sought information "that bear directly on the critical issues of alter ego and successor corporation liability, piercing the corporate veil and principal/agent relationships between and among the various [Ellerbe Becket] entities.
2--Color) Rising stars Ashley Judd, left, and Mira Sorvino depict alter egos of screen goddess Marilyn Monroe in a psychological study of the legendary actress, which debuts Saturday on HBO.
To provide corporations with guidance relating to insulating themselves from, or planning for, state tax liability, this article will review four areas: the nature and history of the nexus requirement, the status of the agency approach, the status of the alter ego approach, and the status of the unitary approach.
A 1980 federal case, in which New York law was applied, drew a significant distinction between the requirements of the agency theory of attributional jurisdiction and those of the alter ego theory.
The foregoing authorities amply illustrate that the distinction between agency theories and alter ego theories is often a finely drawn one -- one that may not be critical to the jurisdictional analysis in a particular case.
Alter ego theories of jurisdiction, in general, reflect an approach to jurisdictional issues resembling very closely the general corporate law concept of "piercing the corporate veil.
The reasoning of the court, however, seems to reflect a legitimate concern with questions of both alter ego and agency in that the holding company effectively utilized its control of the board of directors of the lower-tier entity to achieve its own purposes.