Alma-Ata Declaration

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Alma-Ata Declaration

(al′mă ă-tah′) [Capital of Kazakhstan]
A declaration made in 1978 at the Conference on Primary Health Care in Alma-Ata, USSR. It stated that primary health care is the key to attaining health for all by the year 2000. Eight elements were defined as essential to this: education, food supply, safe water, maternal and child health (including family planning), immunization, prevention and control of endemic diseases, appropriate treatment of common diseases and injuries, and provision of essential drugs.
References in periodicals archive ?
He added that Lebanon qualified to attend the golden jubilee of the Alma Ata Declaration this year to address the issue with the international community, the only country in the Middle East to do so.
Culminating in the Alma Ata declaration of 1978, this movement was explicitly political and saw world health as a rallying point for socio-economic change.
The Alma Ata Declaration of Primary Health Care outlines community participation as one of the core elements to any health promotion initiatives [16, 27].
Development assistance for health has responded to advocacy, especially from the 1978 Alma Ata Declaration on Primary Health Care (PHC) and the People's Charter of Health, Dhaka 2000 which reflected a groundswell of disillusionment over historic failures to adequately address the broader needs of the world's poor.
It highlights new ideas and directions for public health practice in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries that have been strongly influenced by the Alma Ata Declaration of Health for All through Primary Health Care (1978) and the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion (1986).
The World Health Organisation's Alma Ata Declaration of 1978 argued that public health was as much a social-political enterprise as a clinical one.
In 1997, in its Alma Ata declaration, WHO identified reducing inequalities in health in the developing and developed worlds as a key aim, and highlighted the importance for its attainment of two factors - intersectoral collaboration and primary care.
Chapter six includes the evaluation of the concept of integration form the Alma Ata Declaration for primary health care in 1978, through to the ICPD ,POA, and points out that HSR.
Increased access to ARV will contribute to stabilizing their health and lives, and assist them in exercising their basic human rights as embedded in the Alma Ata Declaration on Health for All.
This phase was marked by the plausibility of global social democracy; it encompassed the call for a New International Economic Order (NIEO) and the Alma Ata declaration, a milestone in health care discourse.
1) As early as the 1970s, community participation was advocated for strengthening effectiveness of government development and health services (within the Alma Ata declaration of 1978).
The widely forgotten Alma Ata Declaration of 1978 on primary health care provided a turning point in understanding public health needs as it emphasised the necessity for governments to provide accessible, affordable and comprehensive health care services to all their people.