allopatric speciation

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allopatric speciation

A process in which two or more populations of the same (but geographically separated and non-interbreeding) species become less similar to each other over time, through mutation or survival advantages of different traits in differing environments, and eventually become distinct species.

allopatric speciation

the genetic differentiation of populations which are geographically separate to the point where they become separate SPECIES.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most recent taxonomic revision of the Aspidoscelis hyperythra complex (Grismer, 1999) used the operationalism of diagnosable allopatric populations to elevate five insular populations, recognized as subspecies by Walker and Taylor (1968), to species rank.
Here, we focus on molecular species diagnosis, inferences about the abundance and distribution of oyster species in the northern Ariake Sea, and gamete incompatibility between sympatric and allopatric populations of the Kumamoto and Pacific oysters, C.
Reproductive strategies and the evolution of viviparity in two allopatric populations of the Mexican lizard, Sceloporus aeneus.
We explored the patterns of geographic variation in the fine structural characteristics of the song of five subspecies of Common Bush Tanagers from Mesoamerica, and discuss whether song variation resembles allopatric populations and patterns of genetic variation reported in previous studies (Bonaccorso et al.
Guideline 6: To avoid declines in population fitness caused by outbreeding depression, allopatric populations that qualify as evolutionarily significant units (ESUs), subspecies, or closely related species should not be mixed.
Reinforcement of incompatibilities by selection in sympatry (Servedio and Noor 2003) should lead to a faster reduction of interbreeding in sympatric than in largely allopatric populations (Randler 2006).
It is not clear whether the difference in song would constitute a behavioral barrier to gene flow upon secondary contact among these currently allopatric populations.