alliteration

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al·lit·er·a·tion

(ă-lit-er-ā'shŭn),
In psychiatry, a speech disturbance in which words commencing with the same sounds, usually consonants, are notably frequent.
[Fr. allitération, fr. L. ad, to, + littera, letter of alphabet]

alliteration

(ă-lit″ĕ-rā′shŏn) [L. alliteratio]
A speech disorder in which words beginning with the same consonant sound are used to excess.
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References in periodicals archive ?
To "look up clear," that is, to give the appearance of being untroubled and innocent when they are really guilty, finds an ironic echo later when the innocent guards are gilt in blood to make others not see the truly guilty, the alliteration of the g's further emphasizing the connections between the two words and the grooms:
Next, Shakespeare extends a triple alliteration over two lines:
Finally, we find a triple alliteration of stressed and unstressed syllables on w, combined with possibly another triple alliteration on the sibilants:
While alliteration of this type does create echoes in the sound, more important, it often subtly links key words and ideas together in a line.
Other examples illustrate the remarkable range of complex alliteration found in Macbeth.
In yet another example, Shakespeare uses polyptoton and a triple alliteration, with a third word (come) that is etymologically unrelated, but nonetheless closely echoes the related pair:
let"), diacope, and alliteration, all emphasizing words - light, eye, and see - that are part of a group of iterative images of light and dark and seeing found throughout the play:
But in line with conventional agreement (such as it is), the term is used here to designate the similarity of terminal consonant sounds in a word, a sort of terminal alliteration.
The themes, the organization of the imagery with its alternative and parallel figures, its obvious and even emphatic contrivance, and especially the style with its heavy alliteration and punning and resultant tendency to subvert the literality of the discourse by exposing its ligaments, all combine to give this paragraph a specific identity, a characteristic fusion of form and meaning, and to impart to it, at a deeper, tacit level, a certain ironic provisionality, an implication that there is, to adapt a phrase from R.
For example, the lightly ironical "short of suicide" (an irony produced by the incongruity between the surface meaning and the lexical and acoustic form) is rendered by "kazhetsia, krome samoubiistva" ("I think, besides suicide"), where the primary alliteration is shifted from the following noun to the preceding verb but continues to serve the same stylistic function of removing the sting of "samoubiistva" ("suicide," genitive singular), a word with connotations obviously no less ominous than those in English.
But the most common way of dealing with alliteration in the Russian paragraph (and this is true of Drugie berega as a whole) is to ignore the specific alliterative arrangements of the English text and produce an independent system, one that is not formally but functionally equivalent.
First, although Nabokov may use alliteration in the Russian text, its effect is on the whole less prominent than in the English.