allele

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Related to Alleles: genotype, Multiple alleles

allele

 [ah-lēl´]
one of two or more alternative forms of a gene at the same site in a chromosome, which determine alternative characters in inheritance. adj., adj allel´ic.
silent allele one that produces no detectable effect.

al·lele

(ă-lēl'), Avoid the mispronunciations al-ĕl' and al'ēl.
Any one of a series of two or more different genes that may occupy the same locus on a specific chromosome. As autosomal chromosomes are paired, each autosomal gene is represented twice in normal somatic cells. If the same allele occupies both units of the locus, the individual or cell is homozygous for this allele. If the alleles are different, the individual or cell is heterozygous for both alleles. See: DNA markers.
See also: dominance of traits.
Synonym(s): allelomorph
[G. allēlōn, reciprocally]

allele

/al·lele/ (ah-lēl´) one of two or more alternative forms of a gene at corresponding sites (loci) on homologous chromosomes, which determine alternative characters in inheritance.allel´ic
multiple alleles  alleles of which there are more than two alternative forms possible at any one locus.

allele

(ə-lēl′)
n.
Any of the alternative forms of a gene or other homologous DNA sequence. Also called allelomorph.

al·le′lic (ə-lē′lĭk, ə-lĕl′ĭk) adj.
al·le′lism n.

allele

[əlēl′]
1 one of two or more alternative forms of a gene that occupy corresponding loci on homologous chromosomes. Each allele encodes a phenotypic feature or a certain inherited characteristic. An individual normally has two alleles for each gene, one contributed by the mother and one by the father. If both alleles are the same, the individual is homozygous; if the alleles are different, the individual is heterozygous. In heterozygous individuals, one of the alleles is usually dominant, and the other is recessive. In humans, for example, the allele for brown eyes is dominant, and the allele for blue eyes is recessive.
2 one of two or more contrasting characteristics transmitted by alternative forms of a gene. Also called allelomorph. allelic, adj.

allele

One of two or more alternate form of a gene, which results in different gene products; any one of two or more variants of a gene that occupy the same position (locus) on a chromosome, which may differ in nucleotide sequence, but not substantively in function or effect.

In eukaryotic cells, alleles exist in pairs—usually one allele is contributed by each parent. The phenotypic expression of an allele is a function of whether the gene is dominant (in which case only one allele is needed for expression) or recessive (requiring that both alleles be the same for expression of a trait). Autosomal chromosomes are paired and each locus is represented twice; the presence of identical alleles on the same locus are said to be homozygous; the presence of two different alleles on the same locus are heterozygous.

allele

Genetics An alternate form of a gene, which results in different gene products; any one of 2 or more variants of a gene that occupy the same position–locus on a chromosome, which may differ in nucleotide sequence, but not substantively in function or effect. See Amorphic allele, Pseudoallele allele, Reeler allele, Wimp allele.

al·lele

(ă-lēl')
Any one of a series of two or more different genes that may occupy the same locus on a specific chromosome. As autosomal chromosomes are paired, each autosomal gene is represented twice in normal somatic cells. If the same allele occupies both units of the locus, the individual or cell is homozygous for this allele. If the alleles are different, the individual or cell is heterozygous for both alleles.
See also: DNA markers
Synonym(s): allelomorph.
[G. allēlōn, reciprocally]

allele

Short for allelomorph.
1. Genes that occupy corresponding positions (HOMOLOGOUS loci) on homologous chromosomes. Humans have two, usually identical, alleles for each gene, one on each AUTOSOMAL chromosome of a pair.
2. One of the ways in which a gene, at a particular location on a chromosome, may differ in its DNA sequence from the normal or from its fellow at the corresponding location on the other chromosome. If different alleles of a gene occur at the corresponding sites on the pair of chromosomes the individual is said to be HETEROZYGOUS for the gene. If the two alleles are abnormal in the same way, the individual is HOMOZYGOUS and the characteristic determined by the gene defect will be present. Heterozygous individuals will show the features of the DOMINANT gene. The other allele is RECESSIVE. The term derives from the Greek allos , another.

allele

a particular form of GENE. Alleles usually occur in pairs, one on each HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOME in a DIPLOID cell nucleus. When both alleles are the same the individual is described as being a HOMOZYGOTE; when each allele is different the individual is a HETEROZYGOTE. The number of allelic forms of a gene can be many (MULTIPLE ALLELISM), each form having a slightly different sequence of DNA bases but with the same overall structure. Each diploid can, however, carry only two alleles at one time. See also DOMINANCE (1).

genotype

The complete genetic constitution of an individual at a particular location (locus) in the genome. At many locations (loci) throughout the genome, the chromosomal DNA sequence differs subtly between individuals. Each of the various DNA sequences at one locus is called an allele: for instance, if there are three sequence variants present, then there are three alleles. Offspring inherit one homologous chromosome from each parent. Thus, a genotype comprises two alleles: the allele inherited from the father (carried on the paternal chromosome) and the allele inherited from the mother (carried on the maternal chromosome). See gene; phenotype.

al·lele

(ă-lēl')
Any one of a series of two or more different genes that may occupy the same locus on a specific chromosome.
[G. allēlōn, reciprocally]

allele (əlēl´),

n (allelomorph), one or more genes occupying the same location in a chromosome but differing because of a mutational change of one.

allele

one of two or more alternative forms of a gene at the same site or locus in each of a pair of chromosomes, which determine alternative characters in inheritance. Called also allelomorph.

blank allele
an allele which produces an antigen which cannot be detected.
null allele
see silent allele (below).
silent allele
one that produces no detectable effect.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dominant alleles at the B locus (B) correspond to black hair and skin color, and recessive alleles at the B.
Allele and genotype frequencies for IL-18 (rs1946519) and CD40 (rs1883832) were determined in AR and non-AR groups.
The results were scanned for inconsistencies of the type encountered when null alleles are segregating.
They pooled data from three randomized REVEAL trials on a total of 648 patients, identifying 399 (62%) who were negative for the epsilon-4 allele, 221 (34%) who were heterozygous carriers of the epsilon-4 allele, and 28 (4%) who were epsilon-4 homozygotes.
It is interesting that only two CSN1S2 alleles (A and F allele) were detected in two Chinese dairy goat breeds in the present study, which is greatly different from the CSN1S2 allelic distribution in European dairy goat breeds.
When the allele type frequencies were compared between RA-patient group and the control group, the DRB1*10 allele was found to be significantly higher in the RA patient group, while the DRB1*07 and DRB1*11 alleles were significantly lower in patients with RA (p<0.
This GABAA receptor consists of five subunits, and studies have found that certain alleles of several subunit genes can influence the risk for alcoholism and other addictions, as well as of conduct disorder symptomology and can modify electrophysiological traits related
The R3 allele that we linked in the current study to lower levels of maternal gentle guidance (i.
Rita crosses pea plants as a hobby Rita decides to cross a pea plant that is homozygous for the purple allele with a pea plant that is homozygous for the white allele.
The 5' dTP-PCR assay generated MCA peak profiles that were slightly different for samples carrying NL and expanded alleles (Fig.
Conversely, 26 per cent of those with the short-short allele were dissatisfied, compared to only 20 per cent of those with the long-long variant.