Alfred Adler


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Alfred Adler

A Viennese psychiatrist (1870–1937), former president of the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society, and contemporary of Freud’s who broke with Freudian orthodoxy and his school of psychoanalysis, as he regarded the social realm and external influences on personality development and disorders as important as the internal realm, which is the focus of Freudian psychoanalysis.

Adler,

Alfred, Austrian psychiatrist, 1870-1937.
adlerian psychoanalysis - a theory of human behavior emphasizing humans' social nature, strivings for mastery, and drive to overcome, by compensation, feelings of inferiority. Synonym(s): individual psychology; adlerian psychology
adlerian psychology - Synonym(s): adlerian psychoanalysis
References in periodicals archive ?
Cox uses the Style-of-Life theory of famed Vienna psychologist Alfred Adler to help readers excavate and truly learn their hidden goals, strengths and weaknesses.
This collection of 24 essays offers a comprehensive re-visitation of psychologist and psycho-therapy theorist, Alfred Adler.
The School's mission is to train socially responsible graduates who continue the visionary work of Alfred Adler.
Vienna's "cafe culture" became an incubator for the Jewish intelligentsia: Luminaries such as writer Stefan Zweig, psychologist Alfred Adler and the young journalist and play--wright Theodor Herz' were among those who sipped coffee in the Austrian capital.
Psychologist Alfred Adler suggested that human beings need both courage and social interest to navigate the challenges of life.
Psychotherapist Alfred Adler, MD, and founder of the school of individual psychology observed, "Meanings are not determined by situations, but we determine them ourselves by the meanings we give to situations.
His chief theological source for existential theology is Paul Tillich, chiefly backed by Alfred Adler and Erich Fromm.
That definition, by psychologist Alfred Adler, made sense, since the offenders had no good reason to feel superior.
Maybe, as Alfred Adler, the Austrian psychiatrist and contemporary of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung, viewed it, birth order can leave an indelible impression on the firstborn's style of life and habitual ways of dealing with the task of friendship, love and work.
Basically, it is a concept developed by the pioneer psychologist Alfred Adler.
Hall began to shift his interest to the theories of Alfred Adler, much to Freud's disappointment.