Alexander's disease


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Alexander's disease

[al′eg·zan′dərz/]
Etymology: W. Stewart Alexander, English pathologist, 20th century
an infantile form of leukodystrophy, characterized by a collection of eosinophilic material at the surface of the brain and around its blood vessels, resulting in brain enlargement. It also causes macrocephaly, seizures, and spasticity.

Alexander's disease

a congenital, fibrinoid encephalomyelopathy of humans and described in dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
A QUALITY field turned out at the Heartlands Club, Aston, to take part in a 501 competition in an effort to raise money for Alfie Leadbetter, a young man from Middlesbrough who suffers from Alexander's Disease, an illness that destroys the nervous system.
Mum Debbie, 36, who has three other sons, Connor, 14, Kai, six, and three-year-old Ellis, said: "With Alexander's disease, children don't normally survive past seven.
Prominent white matter cavitation in an infant with Alexander's disease.
Glioma, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alexander's disease and stroke are just a few examples of diseases glia are critically involved in.
Alexander's disease (fibrinoid leukodystrophy) is a rare leukodystrophy in which a mutation of the gene for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) on chromosome 11 occurs due to autosomal-recessive inheritance with variable penetrance in male infants.
Adult Alexander's disease without Leukoencephalopathy.
Proceeds from Sunday's event at The Galleries, Washington, will go into a fund for 17-year-old David Pattison, from Seaham, who has Alexander's disease.
The results from an EAE model indicate that this drug may also have therapeutic potential for a great number of other neurologic conditions such as Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis, Transverse Myelitis, Krabbe's Leukodystrophy, Alexander's Disease, Canavan's Disease and Adrenoleukodystrophy," he concluded.

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