Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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Related to Ale yeast: brewers yeast

Saccharomyces boulardii

a yeast species widely prescribed for treatment of diarrhea. Molecular typing shows it to be nearly identical, genetically, to S. cerevisiae; however it is metabolically and physiologically different.
See also: Saccharomyces.

Saccharomyces cerevisiae

A yeast used in recombinant DNA technology to manufacture proteins for medical use, e.g., in vaccine components.
See also: Saccharomyces
References in periodicals archive ?
The New Glarus Kriek is an ale fermented in an Oak Vat using a blend of Ale Yeast and Lactobacillus.
The distinctive taste of Velvet Stout is achieved by a combination of a genuine ale yeast, which gives the beer its fruitiness, and a precise balance of aromatic and bittering hops from the Pacific Northwest.
Point Nude Beach Summer Wheat's unique recipe calls for two varieties of wheat - 'au naturel' unmalted white wheat and malted red wheat - along with specialty barley malts, fresh hops from Washington State's Yakima Valley and the Stevens Point Brewery's own special ale yeast.
The fruit and citrus character from the lemon peel, Noble hops and ale yeast in Summer Ale create a lively kick and bright, clean finish to the pairing.
British ales are brewed with the ale yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, at a temperature of (65-72 F).
It is also fermented using a top-fermenting ale yeast, so we didn't have to bring any new strains into the brewery.
65 [degrees] is fine, but I have gone substantially higher using ale yeast.
The warmer operating temperature of ale yeast encourages a faster, more vigorous fermentation that creates aromatic compounds known as phenols and esters.
While mass-produced lagers and beers are pasteurised and filtered to stop fermentation and then pumped with nitrogen or gas to make them fizz, in real ale yeast is left in the cask to achieve the same effect.
Ale yeast strains ferment at higher temperatures than do the lager strains.
Pour four gallons of cold water into a nine- gallon barrel, then add four gallons more, quite boiling, and six pounds of molasses, with about eight or nine tablespoonfuls of the essence of spruce, and on its getting a little cooler, the same quantity of good ale yeast.
It's a deep, dark and chocolatey black lager based on a Czech recipe, but brewed with ale yeast and UK-grown American hops.