Aid to Families with Dependent Children


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Related to Aid to Families with Dependent Children: AFDC/TANF, TANF

Aid to Families with Dependent Children

A US federal assistance program administered by the Department of Health and Human Services from 1935 until 1996, when it was replaced by the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. The AFDC provided financial assistance to children whose families had low or no income.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aid to Dependent Children was renamed Aid to Families with Dependent Children in the 1962 revisions.
In the case of the swollen black prison population, for example, they would argue that cash benefit plans such as Aid to Families with Dependent Children precipitated the dramatic rise of single-parent households in the black community, which in turn led to a rise in criminal behavior among under-supervised black children.
The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children with Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), which establishes work-focused, time-limited welfare benefits.
This is how we won Social Security, Federal support for affordable housing, public works employment, and aid to families with dependent children in the 1930s, and how we won Medicare, Medicaid, various anti-poverty programs like Head Start and Community Action and civil rights enforcement in the 1960s.
Blacks began to assume an outsized role in depictions of the poor, and particularly in stories about problems and abuse in programs such as Aid to Families with Dependent Children or the ill-fated Comprehensive Education and Training Act.
Statistics show that 368 local families receive Aid to Families with Dependent Children, officials said.
Among its provisions, the act abolishes Aid to Families with Dependent Children and removes the safety net provided by the entitlement.
Although the well-off have long been able to direct personal assistance services according to their preferences, people who rely on publicly financed services or on services paid for out of insurance monies have much less control over the services they receive and have significantly less control than people who receive other forms of public assistance, such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC).
Government benefits that are delivered electronically include food stamps, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, and social security benefits.
These savings would be achieved by creating block grants to the states for Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), child care, many child protection programs, Food Stamps, and nutritional assistance capping the growth of these programs at least until the year 2000.
Although the number of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) cases increased between 1989 and '93 by 1.
Of all the antipoverty programs that have come under attack, none has been singled out more than Aid to Families with Dependent Children, or AFDC.