Aaron

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Aar·on

(ar'on),
Charles D., U.S. physician, 1866-1951. See: Aaron sign.

Aaron,

in the Old Testament of the Bible, Moses' brother.
Aaron rod - walking stick (rod) with one serpent twined around it, used as a symbol for medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
See Rabbi Ahron Soloveichik, "Israel's Day of Independence," in Logic of the Heart, Logic of the Mind (Brooklyn: Genesis Jerusalem Press, 1991), pp.
Drawing on his experience as historian and journalist, Ahron Bregman offers a balanced examination of Israel's past in which the three principal driving themes of Jewish immigration, wars, and attempts to forge peace with Arabs and Palestinians combine into a single compelling narrative.
Ahron Leichtman, of Citizens for a Tobacco-Free Society, said: "The industry is in deep trouble.
IN 1990 I INTERVIEWED MAN NAMED Ahron Leichtman for a story about the anti-smoking movement.
The Charles Dunn Team of Ahron and Aschkenasy Negotiates Three Transactions for $6.
Even as a student, Ahron demonstrated notable leadership abilities, which he has continued to carry into his impressive career.
The risks to his life were no doubt increased by the claim made in a 2002 book by Israeli historian Ahron Bregman that Marwan was a spy who had tipped off Israel about the coming Yom Kippur invasion in 1973.
The 19th century was full of great Ashkenazi chazzanim, but one of the first with technical musical training was Ahron Beer in late 18th century.
In "Constitutional Human Rights and Private Law", Ahron Barak ably sets out theoretical options and advocates an approach that most other authors seem to accept, explicitly or implicitly.
Ahron Leichtman founded Citizens for a Tobacco-Free Society because the merest whiff of tobacco smoke gave him a headache.
Jonathan Ahron of the Retail Services Group in Charles Dunn's West Los Angeles office represented both the buyer, Robertson 46 LLC and the seller, Nathan Goller Revocable Trust.
In 2002, Marwan was named in a book by Israeli historian Ahron Bregman as a spy who had tipped off Israel about the coming Yom Kippur invasion.