biofuel

(redirected from Agrofuel)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

biofuel

Any gas, liquid or solid that can be converted from a raw biological material—vegetation, algae grown in sewage, dry waste, cane sugar or wood pulp through combustion or fermentation to alcohols into fuels useful for industry and transport.

Major biofuels
(1) Biogas generated by anaerobic digestion (“biomethanation”).
(2) Fuel ethanol generated by a yeast-based fermentation of molasses, sugarcane juice or hydrolysed seed.

biofuel

fuel derived from a biological source. Biofuels include ETHANOL (gasohol), METHANE (biogas), fish liver oil and rapeseed oil (biodiesel).
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In January the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (MIST), Honeywell's UOP, Boeing, and Etihad Airways announced plans to establish a salicornia plantation in the United Arab Emirates to produce agrofuel for airplanes.
We demand an immediate halt to the development of land for producing industrial agrofuels for cars, planes and energy production in power stations, including the use of so-called biomass "waste".
How has this been overlooked by the UK, EU, and US governments, which claim agrofuel production is 'sustainable'?
Or think about this: In a world where even before this historic price climb almost a billion people couldn't afford enough to eat, what citizen would say, "Why don't we start shifting prime farmland into agrofuel production and push prices still higher
Extensive agrofuel production also causes serious environmental problems.
Any burnable plant matter can be an agrofuel, but ethanol (fermented from corn, sugar cane, or other food crops) is most common today; biodiesel, derived from soy, palm, or other vegetable oil, is also coming into use.
Ethanol production is now increasing in Latin America with the memorandum signed by the Brazilian and US governments in March 2007 to promote agrofuel production in the region.
African organisations from many countries call for an urgent moratorium and invite all organisations to sign to help protect Africans' food security, forests, water, land rights, farmers and indigenous people from agrofuel developments which are increasingly devouring their land and water resources.
While destruction in Indonesia and Malaysia proceeds, other Asian countries are also developing agrofuel industries, setting mandatory blending targets, and investing in supply and technology transfer deals.
For agrofuel use and production, the G8 is merely planning to "develop scientifically based objectives and indicators" as laid down in decisions.
Agrofuel development on 'marginal' lands will further disenfranchise rural communities and loss of livelihoods and food security experienced by affected communities undermines claims agrofuels can bring development benefits.
Failing to learn from the first-generation agrofuel train wreck, The Economist naively suggests: "there's plenty of biomass to go around" and "the world's hitherto impoverished tropics may find themselves in the middle of an unexpected and welcome industrial revolution.