phenothiazine

(redirected from Agrazine)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

phenothiazine

 [fe″no-thi´ah-zēn]
any of a group of having a similar tricyclic structure and acting as potent dopaminergic and alpha-adrenergic blocking agents, as well as having hypotensive, antispasmodic, antihistaminic, analgesic, sedative, and antiemetic activity.

phe·no·thi·a·zine

(fē'nō-thī'ă-zēn),
A compound formerly used extensively for the treatment of intestinal nematodes in animals; without central nervous system depressant activity itself, it serves as the parent compound for synthesis of a large number of antipsychotic compounds, including chlorpromazine, thioridazine, perphenazine, and fluphenazine.
Synonym(s): thiodiphenylamine

phenothiazine

/phe·no·thi·a·zine/ (fe″no-thi´ah-zēn) any of a group of antipsychotic agents having a similar tricyclic structure and acting as potent alpha-adrenergic and dopaminergic blocking agents, as well as having hypotensive, antispasmodic, antihistaminic, analgesic, sedative, and antiemetic activity..

phenothiazine

(fē′nō-thī′ə-zēn′, -nə-)
n.
1. A yellow organic compound, C12H9NS, used in insecticides, livestock anthelmintics, and dyes.
2. Any of a group of drugs derived from this compound and used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia.

phenothiazine

[fē′nōthī′əzēn]
a yellow to green crystalline compound that is a source of dyes and is used in veterinary medicine to treat infestations of threadworms and roundworms. It is too toxic for human use, but derivatives of phenothiazine are used in antipsychotic and antihistamine medications. See also phenothiazine derivatives.

phenothiazine

A class of antipsychotics and tranquilizers–eg, chlorpromazine, compazine, prochlorperazine, thioridazine, thorazine, possibly used as an antiemetic

phenothiazine

the first broad-spectrum veterinary anthelmintic and the market leader in all agricultural animals for many years. Now largely superseded by more efficient compounds. Used now only in horses. Not recommended for use in pregnant mares because of the fear of causing abortion. Its principal use is in mixtures with piperazine and in small daily doses to inhibit egg-laying by resident worms. It must be supported by regular dosing at full dose rates. The name is also used to denote a group of major tranquilizers resembling phenothiazine in molecular structure.