gerontology

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aging

 [āj´ing]
the gradual changes in the structure of any organism that occur with the passage of time, that do not result from disease or other gross accidents, and that eventually lead to the increased probability of death as the individual grows older. See also aged and senescence, and see the Atlas on Aging.

ger·on·tol·o·gy

(jer'on-tol'ŏ-jē),
The scientific study of the clinical, sociologic, biologic and psychological phenomena related to aging.
Synonym(s): geratology
[geronto- + G. logos, study]

gerontology

/ger·on·tol·o·gy/ (jer″on-tol´ah-je) the scientific study of aging in all its aspects.

gerontology

(jĕr′ən-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The scientific study of the biological, psychological, and sociological phenomena associated with old age and aging.

ge·ron′to·log′i·cal (jə-rŏn′tə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), ge·ron′to·log′ic (-lŏj′ĭk) adj.
ger′on·tol′o·gist n.

gerontology

[jer′əntol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, geras, old age, logos, science
the study of all aspects of the aging process, including the clinical, psychological, economic, and sociological issues encountered by older persons and their consequences for both the individual and society.

gerontology

Geriatics The systematic study of aging and age-related phenomena; senescence is attributed to
1. Accumulation of degradation products, coupled with a cell's ↑ inability to metabolize the products and/or.
2. Activation of longevity-determining or aging genes, that may be intimately linked to certain oncogenes–eg, c-fos, which evokes uncontrolled cell proliferation. See Garbage can hypothesis.

ger·on·tol·o·gy

(jer'ŏn-tol'ŏ-jē)
The scientific study of the process and problems of aging.
[geronto- + G. logos, study]

gerontology

The study of the biology, psychology and sociology of ageing. Gerontology is concerned with the changes that occur in the cells, tissues and organs of the body with age, with the natural limits of cell reproduction, the causes of natural cell death, the effects of life style and physical activity on longevity and the psychological and sociological effects of ageing.

ger·on·tol·o·gy

(jer'ŏn-tol'ŏ-jē)
Scientific study of clinical, sociologic, biologic, and psychological phenomena related to aging.
[geronto- + G. logos, study]

gerontology (jer″ontol´əje),

n the comprehensive (physical, psychologic, and social) study of aging.
References in periodicals archive ?
The AACR is extremely pleased to be partnering with the Alliance for Aging Research on the release of its Silver Book[sup.
This study highlights the tremendous promise of aging research and the public's understanding of its importance," concurs Daniel Perry, executive director of the Alliance for Aging Research.
co-director of the Musculoskeletal Research Program at the Institute for Aging Research.
The Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging Research, which is among those seven groups all over the nation, work for the enhancement of the health of aged minority groups via education, scholarships and involvement in research.
Read more about the pioneers funding innovative aging research
The International Aging Research Portfolio knowledge management system contains millions of grants and publications from many areas of science and may be used to get very granular and detailed answers.
Americans favor increased funding for medical research and have high expectations that research will increase their longevity, a survey of 1,000 adults released by the Alliance for Aging Research shows.
Neil Charness, PhD, of Florida State University, addressing the same symposium, emphasized that future support for nonbiologic aging research lies in making psychological science more useful to the elderly.
Chief of the UCLA Memory and Aging Research Center.
12, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The nonprofit Alliance for Aging Research has launched a new campaign to raise awareness about venous thromboembolism (VTE), the third most common cardiovascular illness, and its associated conditions deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE).
We report findings of a 20-year longitudinal adult-onset CR study in rhesus monkeys aimed at filling this critical gap in aging research.
Typical topics of federally supported aging research today include association of the biochemical interleukin-6 with depression in older people and proof that a mutation in the Tau gene of chromosome 17 produces degenerative dementia among the elderly.