aggression

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aggression

 [ah-gresh´un]
a form of physical or verbal behavior leading to self-assertion; it is often angry and destructive and intended to be injurious, physically or emotionally, and aimed at domination of one person by another. It may arise from innate drives and/or be a response to frustration, and may be manifested by overt attacking and destructive behavior, by covert attitudes of hostility and obstructionism, or by a healthy self-expressive drive to mastery.

ag·gres·sion

(ă-gre'shŭn),
1. A domineering, forceful, or assaultive verbal or physical action intended to hurt another animal or person; the verbal or motor behavioral expression of the affects of anger, hostility, or rage.
2. Invasive behavior, as of a pathogenic organism or disease process.
[L. aggressio, fr. aggredior, to accost, attack]

aggression

/ag·gres·sion/ (ah-gresh´un) behavior leading to self-assertion; it may arise from innate drives and/or a response to frustration, and may be manifested by destructive and attacking behavior, by hostility and obstructionism, or by self-expressive drive to mastery.

aggression

(ə-grĕsh′ən)
n.
Hostile or destructive behavior or attitudes: physical aggression; verbal aggression; emotional aggression.

aggression

[əgresh′ən]
Etymology: L, aggressio, to attack
a forceful behavior, action, or attitude that is expressed physically, verbally, or symbolically. It may arise from innate drives or occur as a defense mechanism, often resulting from a threatened ego. It is manifested by either constructive or destructive acts directed toward oneself or against others. Kinds of aggression are constructive aggression, destructive aggression, and inward aggression.

Aggression

Forceful physical, verbal, or symbolic action which is either appropriate and self-protective (e.g., self-assertiveness) or inappropriate (e.g., hostile or destructive behaviour). It may be directed outwardly at either the environment or another person, or inwardly towards one’s self, manifesting as depression, self-mutilation, or another negative response.

aggression

Psychiatry Forceful physical, verbal, or symbolic action which may be appropriate and self-protective–eg, healthy self-assertiveness, or inappropriate–eg, hostile or destructive behavior; aggression may be directed toward the environment, another person/personality, or toward the self–eg, depression

ag·gres·sion

(ă-gresh'ŭn)
A domineering, forceful, or assaultive verbal or physical action toward another person as an expression of anger, hostility, or rage.
[L. aggressio, fr. aggredior, to accost, attack]

aggression

Feelings or acts of hostility. Abnormal aggression is often associated with emotional deprivation in childhood, head injury, or brain disease, such as tumour, excessive alcohol intake or the use of drugs such as amphetamines (amfetamines).

aggression

a type of behaviour that includes both threats and actual attacks on other animals, though often limited to threat display. See also AGONISTIC BEHAVIOUR.

aggression

behaviour with the intent of causing harm to another individual or group.

aggression

behavior that is angry and destructive and intended to be injurious, physically or emotionally, and aimed at domination of one animal by another. It may be manifested by overt attacking and destructive behavior or by covert attitudes of hostility and obstructionism. The most common behavioral problem seen in dogs.

affective aggression
involves intense, patterned autonomic activation with sympathetic and adrenal stimulation.
fear-induced aggression
accompanied by fear and usually when escape is not possible; may be associated with previous unpleasant experiences.
food-related aggression
directed towards people or animals when approached while eating. An early indicator of the risk of developing dominance aggression.
interfemale aggression
dominance aggression between females.
intermale aggression
fighting between males, most commonly tomcats; includes elements of competitive, territorial and sexual aggression.
maternal aggression
the dam's protection of her young; a variant of dominance aggression.
nonaffective aggression
without autonomic activation.
pain-induced aggression
defensive aggression triggered by pain.
play aggression
biting, nipping and growling at people or other animals during play.
possessive aggression
a form of dominance aggression; the animal is reacting against someone or another animal trying to remove something, usually food.
predatory aggression
directed towards any kind of animal, including dogs and humans, or even inanimate objects. Typically, it is elicited by something that is moving quickly.
protective aggression
the animal is protecting its territory. See territorial aggression (below).
redirected aggression
occurs when the animal is touched or restrained by a human or another animal, while it is fighting or threatening.
territorial aggression
behavior directed toward the defense of an area by an individual or a group against entry by others, usually members of the same species but the trait is developed in guard dogs that protect property from human intruders.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aggressivity, narcissism, and self destructiveness in the psychotherapeutic relationship.
Aggressivity (A) value was the minimum for barley + garlic which indicates the most competitive crop with barleywhile the lentil chickpea and egyptian clover showed less competition with barley (Table 5).
Pity thus serves Rousseau as a means to counter the Hobbesian and Mandevillian concepts of an innate human aggressivity and is what prevents man from being a monster: "Mandeville a bien senti qu'avec toute leur morale les hommes n'eussent jamais ete que des monstres, si la Nature ne leur eilt donne la pitie" (155).
The electrochemical test shows an intermediate aggressivity between the atmosphere and salt fog tests.
Settler aggressivity, after all, persists even after indigenous alterities have ceased to be threatening.
2) The endocrine manifestations and aggressivity of pituitary adenomas are usually correlated with specific morphologic phenotypes.
From his work in the 1930s on aggressivity and narcissism onwards, Lacan was keen to identify the limit point around which the movements of Imaginary misrecognition and Symbolic identification fail.
Intercropping systems were assessed on the basis of intercropping indices such as land equivalent ratio (LER), relative crowding coefficient (RCC or K), aggressivity (A), and competitive ratio (CR).
The 44-year-old director added: "The feeling I have about the past we share is a kind of hostility, aggressivity, the fact that we experienced violence, that we suffered this pain but aren't responsible for it.
In her frequent confrontations with the Puritans, the Dog-Woman again demonstrates her affinity with a "masculine" ethos of aggressivity and contention.
Some studies have concluded that video games develop skills such as high-level thinking, reaction times, visual attention and literacy (Delwiche, 2006) while others have unearthed evidence that long exposure to video games can diminish brain activity, create emotional and behavioral problems (Mori, 2002) and even increase aggressivity and violent conduct (Anderson & Bushman, 2001).
The feminism that emerges in The Voyage Out is the most conspicuous way in which the novel addresses a political concern; moreover, as she would later do even more decisively in Three Guineas, Woolf connected the subordination of women to the question of war, which, she argued, was a direct consequence of a system that sanctioned and even encouraged masculine aggressivity.