agglutination

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agglutination

 [ah-gloo″tĭ-na´shun]
1. the action of an agglutinant substance.
2. the clumping together in suspension of antigen-bearing cells, microorganisms, or particles in the presence of specific antibodies (agglutinins).
Agglutination reactions. From Applegate, 2000.
3. the process of union of the surfaces of a wound. adj., adj agglutina´tive.
cross agglutination the agglutination of particulate antigen by an antibody raised against a different but related antigen; see also group agglutination.
group agglutination agglutination, usually to a lower titer, of various members of a group of biologically related organisms by an agglutinin specific for one of that group. For instance, the specific agglutinin of typhoid bacilli may agglutinate other members of the colon-typhoid group, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis.
intravascular agglutination clumping of particulate elements within the blood vessels; used conventionally to denote red blood cell agglutination.
platelet agglutination the clumping together of platelets owing to the action of platelet agglutinins; such agglutinins are important in platelet typing.
agglutination test any test based on an agglutination reaction, as serologic tests for specific antibodies.

ag·glu·ti·na·tion

(ă-glū-ti-nā'shŭn),
1. The process by which suspended bacteria, cells, or other particles are caused to adhere and form into clumps; similar to precipitation, but the particles are larger and are in suspension rather than being in solution. For specific agglutination reactions in the various blood groups, see Blood Groups Appendix.
2. Adhesion of the surfaces of a wound.
3. The process of adhering.
[L. ad, to, + gluten, glue]

agglutination

/ag·glu·ti·na·tion/ (ah-gloo″tĭ-na´shun)
1. the action of an agglutinant substance.
2. the process of union in wound healing.
3. the clumping together in suspension of antigen-bearing cells, microorganisms, or particles in the presence of specific antibodies (agglutinins).agglu´tinative

cross agglutination  the agglutination of particulate antigen by antibody raised against a different but related antigen; see also group a.
group agglutination  agglutination of members of a group of biologically related organisms or corpuscles by an agglutinin specific for that group.
intravascular agglutination  clumping of particulate elements within the blood vessels; used conventionally to denote red blood cell aggregation.

agglutination

(ə-glo͞ot′n-ā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of agglutinating; adhesion of distinct parts.
2. A clumped mass of material formed by agglutination. Also called agglutinate.
3. Physiology The clumping together of red blood cells or bacteria, usually in response to a particular antibody.
4. Linguistics The formation of words from morphemes that retain their original forms and meanings with little change during the combination process.

ag·glu′ti·na′tive (-n-ā′tĭv, -ə-tĭv) adj.

agglutination

[əglo̅o̅′tinā′shən]
Etymology: L, agglutinare, to glue
the clumping of cells or particulate antigens as a result of interaction and crosslinking with agglutinins. agglutinate, v.

agglutination

Lab medicine The clumping of aggregates of antigens or antigenic material-eg bacteria, viruses, with antibodies in a solution. See Latex agglutination test Reproductive biology The conjoining of 2 organisms of the same species for sexual reproduction, which may be mediated by a carbohydrate on one organism and a protein on the other, thereby forming a glycoprotein.

ag·glu·ti·na·tion

(ă-glū'ti-nā'shŭn)
1. The process by which suspended bacteria, cells, or other particles are caused to adhere and form clumps; similar to precipitation, but the particles are larger and are in suspension rather than being in solution.
2. Adhesion of the surfaces of a wound.
3. The process of adhering.
[L. ad, to, + gluten, glue]

agglutination

The clumping and sticking together of normally free cells or bacteria or other small particles so as to form visible aggregates. Agglutination is one of the ways in which ANTIBODIES operate. From the Latin ad , to and glutinare , to glue.

agglutination

a clumping together of cells, usually as a result of reaction between specific ANTIGENS and ANTIBODIES in blood and lymph, forming a natural defence against foreign materials, including bacterial cells. Transfusion of blood between persons of different ABO BLOOD GROUPS is also subject to the risk of agglutination (see UNIVERSAL DONOR and UNIVERSAL RECIPIENT). Agglutination is a different process from BLOOD CLOTTING.

agglutination

clumping of cells or particles suspended within a medium

ag·glu·ti·na·tion

(ă-glū'ti-nā'shŭn)
1. The process by which suspended bacteria, cells, or other particles are caused to adhere and form into clumps.
2. Adhesion of the surfaces of a wound.
3. The process of adhering.
[L. ad, to, + gluten, glue]

agglutination (əglōō´tinā´shən),

n the aggregation or clumping together of cells as a result of their interaction with specific antibodies called agglutinins, commonly used in blood typing and in identifying or estimating the strength of immunoglobulins or immune sera.

agglutination

aggregation of separate particles into clumps or masses; especially the clumping of bacteria or blood cells by antibody specific to, or directed against, surface antigenic determinants. See also agglutinin.

bacterial agglutination test
a diagnostic procedure that employs serum or other body fluid of unknown antibody titer, titrated with standard suspension of bacteria as antigen. These may be performed quantitatively in 96-well microtitration plates or qualitatively on slides.
cross agglutination
the agglutination of particulate antigen by an antibody raised against a different but related antigen; see also group agglutination (below).
group agglutination
agglutination—usually to a lower titer—of various members of a group of biologically related organisms by an agglutinating antibody made to one of that group.
intravascular agglutination
clumping of particulate elements within the blood vessels; used conventionally to denote red blood cell agglutination.
latex agglutination test
see passive agglutination test (below).
microscopic agglutination test
one in which the test mixtures are examined microscopically to detect the agglutination.
mucus agglutination test
see mucus agglutination test.
passive agglutination test
an agglutination reaction in which a soluble antigen, such as gonadotropin, is linked to inert particles such as latex beads or tanned erythrocytes.
platelet agglutination
the clumping together of platelets owing to the action of platelet agglutinins. Such agglutinins are important in platelet typing.
slide agglutination test
a rapid screening or semiquantitative test in which antibody and antigen are mixed on a glass slide and observed for agglutination.
agglutination test
see bacterial agglutination test (above).
tube agglutination test
an agglutination test for the identification of bacteria carried out in a test tube, a positive reaction consisting of a clearing of a prior opalescence.