AREDS

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AREDS

Age-Related Eye Disease Study. A trial sponsored by the US National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health, which compared the effects of zinc and/or antioxidants to a placebo.
Conclusion Patients taking antioxidants and zinc had a significant reduction in the risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration.
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Risk factors for the incidence of advanced age-related macular degeneration in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) AREDS report no.
One involves taking the high daily doses of vitamin C (500 mg), vitamin E (400 IU), beta-carotene (25,000 IU), and zinc (80 mg) that were used in the first Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), a clinical trial that the National Eye Institute completed in 2001.
Patients with cognitive impairment were more likely to have reduced visual acuity and/or age-related macular degeneration (AMD), compared with those who were not cognitively impaired, reported investigators in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study, a multicenter study of AMD and age-related cataract (Arch.
Data from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) show the following daily regimen may help slow the progression of macular degeneration and preserve vision.
The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) was sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and involved 4,757 participants, 55 to 80 years of age, in 11 research centers around the country.
Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) Examines Macular Degeneration Risk Related to Cataract Surgery
In addition, it provides information on macular pigment measuring devices, a summary of the second Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS2) and details on current trials.
Research: Oral supplementation with the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation (antioxidant vitamins C and E, beta-carotene and zinc) has been shown to reduce the risk of progression to advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
Editor's note: The finding adds evidence to that of other research, including the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), concerning the benefit of nutritional components against macular degeneration.
Researchers studied more than 4,500 people aged 60 to 80 who had enrolled in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study.
For the nonexudative (dry) form, a specially formulated combination of the antioxidants vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta-carotene, copper, and zinc is the one widely accepted preventative agent, based on the results of a large randomized prospective multicenter study called the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS).
The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) involved 4,753 patients aged 55-80.