lipofuscin

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Related to Age pigment: Ceroid

lipofuscin

 [lip″o-fu´sin]
1. a yellow to brown, granular, iron-negative lipid pigment found particularly in muscle, heart, liver, and nerve cells; it is the product of cellular wear and tear, accumulating in lysosomes with age.

lip·o·fus·cin

(lip'ō-fyūs'in),
Brown pigment granules representing lipid-containing residues of lysosomal digestion and considered one of the aging or "wear and tear" pigments; found in liver, kidney, heart muscle, adrenal, and ganglion cells.

lipofuscin

/lipo·fus·cin/ (-fu´sin) any of a class of fatty pigments formed by the solution of a pigment in fat.

lipofuscin

(lĭp′ō-fŭs′ĭn, -fyo͞o′sĭn)
n.
A lipid-containing brownish-yellow pigment that occurs in granules especially in senescent cells.

lipofuscin

[lip′əfus′in]
a class of fatty pigments consisting mostly of oxidized fats that are found in abundance in the cells of adults. Lipofuscins accumulate in lysosomes with age.

lipofuscin

A pigmented lipid degradation product thought to derive from peroxidative destruction of mitochondrial polyunsaturated lipid membrane or the mitochondrion itself; the malonaldehyde produced by mitochondrial peroxide damage may block DNA template, activity contributing to heart failure; lipofuscin accumulates with age in the heart, muscle, liver, nerve, and in lysosomes

lip·o·fus·cin

(lip'ō-fyūs'in)
Brown pigment granules representing lipid-containing residues of lysosomal digestion and considered one of the aging or "wear-and-tear" pigments; found in liver, kidney, heart muscle, and ganglion cells.

lipofuscin

A golden-brown pigment that occurs in granules in muscle and nerve cells in numbers proportional to the age of the individual. Also known as age pigment.

lipofuscin (līˈ·pō·fyōōˑ·sin),

n brown-colored pigment characteristic of aging. Found in liposomes and prod-uct of peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids.

lipofuscin

Yellowish-brown pigment granules formed as a result of oxidation of protein and lipid residues, and found in various tissues (e.g. liver, kidney, heart muscle, adrenals, nerve cells). It normally accumulates with age within the lysosomes of cells and its accumulation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a major risk factor of age-related macular degeneration as it may damage RPE cells and lead to the formation of drusen and RPE atrophy. In albinos the pigment granules are immature and colourless.

lipofuscin

any of a class of fatty pigments formed by the solution of a pigment in fat. They take the form of golden granular deposits derived from lipid components of membranous organelles, and commonly occur with advancing age or vitamin E deficiency. Called also abnutzen pigment.

lipofuscin-like pigment
accumulates in the liver of patients, e.g. mutant Corriedale sheep, which lack enzymes necessary for bile salt conjugation and transport; the livers of affected sheep are black.