Age Bias

Age Bias

Any shift in a health provider’s patient management, which is based solely on the patient’s age, and not on physical condition. Age bias could result in undertreatment of a healthy and robust 90-year-old, and overtreatment of a 60-year-old in poor health.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is no gender bias, no age bias and no fitness level bias.
Though the preference for older players has held nearly constant for 27 years, the career data from Deaner and his colleagues shows that this relative age bias can be irrational.
There was no age bias in this view, and most respondents indicated that they found their work rewarding and psychologically stimulating.
Dr Aly added that interested candidates need to be technically efficient, disregard any bias relating to political, religious or cultural backgrounds, including age bias, be able to communicate online, be willing to dedicate part of his/her time to the council and have good conduct with others.
From Table 2 we get a sense of those races it may prove profitable to approach with an age bias at this time of year.
As I've indicated in earlier contributions, we are living through a period of age bias when it comes to hiring mature workers, many of whom were laid off aggressively during the recession.
The increasing age of the workforce, the presence of age bias in society generally, together with the fact that the consequences of unemployment fall more harshly on older people, make the topic of age discrimination in employment a significant one--legally, ethically, and practically.
The research comes after a report last week found older people are more likely to die of cancer because they receive less investigation of and treatment for their disease due to age bias in the NHS.
Although a mature senior citizen I experienced no age bias whatsoever, and wish to thank the staff unreservedly, and glad to say their medicine worked.
Subjects also showed biases when judging the age of faces, but the pattern for age bias was independent from the pattern for gender bias in each individual.
This age bias continues when looking at the desired retirement ages and length of tenure among those younger than those older than 60 years: for younger directors, mandatory retirement age should be 71; for older directors, that age increases to 73 years.