silver

(redirected from AgSD, SSD)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.

silver

 [sil´ver]
a chemical element, atomic number 47, atomic weight 107.870, symbol Ag. (See Appendix 6.) It is used in medicine for its caustic, astringent, and antiseptic effects. It is also used in dentistry in alloys, in soldering, and as cones to obliterate the root canal.
silver nitrate colorless or white crystals, used as a caustic and local antiinfective; an important use is in prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum.
silver protein silver made colloidal by the presence of, or combination with, protein; an active germicide with a local irritant and astringent effect.
silver sulfadiazine the silver derivative of sulfadiazine, having bactericidal activity against many gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, as well as being effective against yeasts; used as a topical antiinfective for the prevention and treatment of wound sepsis in patients with second and third degree burns.
toughened silver nitrate a mixture of silver nitrate with hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride, or potassium nitrate, occurring as white crystalline masses molded into pencils or cones; a convenient means of applying silver nitrate locally.

Sil·ver

(sil'vĕr),
Henry K., 20th-century U.S. pediatrician. See: Silver-Russell dwarfism, Silver-Russell syndrome.

sil·ver (Ag),

(sil'vĕr),
L. argentum; a metallic element, atomic no. 47, atomic wt. 107.8682. Many salts have clinical applications.
Synonym(s): argentum
[A.S. seolfor]

silver

/sil·ver/ (sil´ver) a chemical element, at. no. 47, symbol Ag.
silver nitrate  used as a local anti-infective, as in the prophylaxis of ophthalmia neonatorum.
silver protein  silver made colloidal by the presence of, or combination with, protein; it may be mild, used as a topical anti-infective, or strong, used as an active germicide with a local irritant and astringent effect.
silver sulfadiazine  the silver derivative of sulfadiazine, having bactericidal activity against many gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, as well as being effective against yeasts; used as a topical antiinfective for the prevention and treatment of wound sepsis in patients with second and third degree burns.
toughened silver nitrate  a compound of silver nitrate, hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride, or potassium nitrate; used as a caustic, applied topically after being dipped in water.

silver (Ag)

Etymology: AS, seolfor
a whitish precious metal occurring mainly as a sulfide. Its atomic number is 47; its atomic mass is 107.88. It is quite soft and is usually alloyed with small amounts of copper to increase its durability. Silver dissolves readily in nitric acid and is used extensively to produce silver halides used in photographic emulsions. It is frequently associated in small amounts with the ores of zinc, copper, and lead and is used extensively as a component of amalgams of dental fillings and in many medications, especially antiseptics and astringents. Some antiseptics containing silver are mild silver protein and strong silver protein, preparations that render silver colloidal in the presence of protein. Mild silver protein contains 19% to 23% silver. Strong silver protein contains 7.5% to 8.5% silver. Both preparations are used externally as antiseptics and do not have irritating properties. Silver nitrate is used externally as an antiseptic and astringent, especially in the prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum. It is also used as a lubricant on the bearings of radiography tubes, and silver halides are used in x-ray films. Silver picrate, an ionizable salt of silver, is used in the treatment of trichomoniasis and moniliasis of the vagina.

Silver

The title of the middle level of response—the others being Gold and Bronze—adopted by each of the emergency services (police, fire, ambulance, emergency medical) in the event of a major incident (disaster) in the UK, which is role, rather than rank, related. Silver responders are usually near the event, but not on site, and thus are protected from physical risk posed by the incident; they attend the scene, take charge and are responsible for formulating the tactics to be adopted by their service to achieve the strategy set by Gold. Silvers also get a “flash” vest, but a different colour. Like Gold, Silver should not become involved with activities close to the incident, but remain detached from them.

silver

Toxicology A metallic element–atomic number, 47; atomic weight, 107.9, which may be ingested as silver nitrate, an antiseptic for conjunctivitis in newborns, and skin infections in Pts with extensive burns, or due to industrial exposure Clinical–acute Pain and burning in mouth, vomiting, diarrhea, collapse, coma, death Clinical–chronic Blackened mucocutaneous surfaces

sil·ver

(Ag) (sil'vĕr)
L. argentum; a metallic element, atomic no. 47, atomic wt. 107.8682. Many salts have clinical applications.
[A.S. seolfor]

sil·ver

(sil'vĕr)
L. argentum; a metallic element; many salts have clinical applications; used in dental amalgams and gold alloys.
[A.S. seolfor]

silver (Ag),

n a whitish precious metal occurring mainly as a sulfide. Its atomic number is 47, and its atomic weight is 107.88. It is quite soft and is usually alloyed with small amounts of copper to increase its durability. It is used extensively in photography, radiography, and dentistry.
silver amalgam,
silver cones,
n an endodontic filling material used in conjunction with gutta-percha points and sealing agents to effect a seal of the pulp chamber and canal. Also known as
master cones.
silver halide crystals,
silver nitrate, ammoniacal
n (ammoniated silver nitrate, Howe's silver nitrate), an ammonium compound of silver nitrate that is more readily reduced to silver and silver proteinates than is the usual silver nitrate; formerly used to disclose carious tooth structure and immunize incipient carious lesions of the enamel. It is highly irritating to the pulp and can permanently stain the oral mucosa.
silver nitrate, Howe's,
n.pr See silver nitrate, ammoniacal.
silver points,
n See silver cones.

silver

1. a chemical element, atomic number 47, atomic weight 107.870, symbol Ag. See Table 6. It is used in medicine for its caustic, astringent and antiseptic effects. Experimental poisoning with silver salts causes myopathy.
2. a coat color in dogs, foxes.

silver amalgam
see amalgam.
silver collie syndrome
see canine cyclic hematopoiesis.
silver grass
aristidacontorta.
silver halide
any of the silver salts with halogens including bromine, chlorine, iodine used in photographic emulsion.
silver iodide
soluble silver salt used in cloud seeding but presents no toxicological risk to local grazing cattle.
silver-leaf ironbark
eucalyptusmelanophloia.
silver-leafed nightshade
solanumelaeagnifolium.
silver nitrate
colorless or white crystals, used as a caustic and local anti-infective.
silver nitrate (toughened)
a mixture of silver nitrate with hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride or potassium nitrate, occurring as white crystalline masses molded into pencils or cones, called caustic pencils; a convenient means of applying silver nitrate locally. Called also lunar caustic.
silver protein
silver made colloidal by the presence of, or combination with, protein; an active germicide with a local irritant and astringent effect.
silver stain
a method of demonstrating flagella on bacteria, or for visualizing very thin bacteria, such as leptospires.
silver sulfadiazine
the silver salt of sulfadiazine, having bactericidal activity against many gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, as well as being effective against yeasts; used as a topical anti-infective for the prevention and treatment of wound sepsis in patients with second and third degree burns.
silver weed