Afrocentrism

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Related to Afrocentrists: Afrocentric Egyptology

Afrocentrism

A primarily American cultural philosophy which re-examines African American history and views the African American legacy as having been downplayed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the Afrocentrists seek for the African person the contentment of subject, active and agent place.
No, this does not work, and what Afrocentrists have done is to propose that multiculturalism can only work when Whites are seen as being alongside every other cultural group, not above, not outside the mix as some governing hand.
What troubled Salzman, however, was not the fact that "Blacks" and "Jews" had been reduced to monolithic entities either working in concert or lunging at one another but that the official version of their history had been strongly challenged by Afrocentrists and their followers.
Unlike many regional archaeologies the study of Egypt has always had widespread appeal, from archaeologists to Afrocentrists, orientalists to occultists.
Africa is neither the hell on earth too many news stories suggest it is, nor the nirvana some Afrocentrists would have us believe.
Even leading Afrocentrists like Molefi Asante of Temple University have seized the opportunity to debate Lefkowitz in public.
For the Afrocentrists, science means an oppressive white Western enclave that has systematically pillaged and ignored so-called African science, especially that of the ancient Egyptians.
There are negative critics of the Afrocentric movement who imply that Afrocentrists merely plan to substitute a dishonest "Afrocentric" version of history to replace European history.
As such Afrocentrists have expressed no interest in one race or culture dominating another.
In effect, Afrocentrists concurrently reflect on what it means to be African and human in the fullest sense.
The many minor themes in Race and the Writing of History will long occupy Keita and readers inspired by his analysis, notably the relationship among the various generations of African, African-American, and Afro-British Afrocentrists such as Cheikh Anta Diop and his student Theophile Obenga, Valentine Mudimbe, Ali Mazrui, Molefe Asante, and Paul Gilroy.
Du Bois and Martin Luther King were not Afrocentrists.