Afrocentrism

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Afrocentrism

A primarily American cultural philosophy which re-examines African American history and views the African American legacy as having been downplayed.
References in periodicals archive ?
King in his speech, but will interpret his dream against three different background sets of ideas that generate three separate dreams-the Individualist Dream, the Nationalist Dream and the Afrocentrist Dream.
They include the absence of scholarly unanimity over the exact nature of philosophy and, by extension, African philosophy; the dispute over the beginning of philosophy in Ancient Egypt, as well as the Afrocentrist assertion of the origin of Greek philosophy in Egypt; the problem of periodization; the status of ethnophilosophy, and so forth.
joining only all-Black organizations, attending pro-Black functions, wearing African clothing, taking African names) were related to Black Nationalist perspectives, such as the Afrocentrist or separatist.
Asa Hilliard III, a professor at Georgia State University in Atlanta and a leader in the Afrocentrist movement, was "widely lauded around town as a distinguished scholar and role model for young blacks" (p.
Smart-Grosvenor, who could well be called a gastronomic Afrocentrist, celebrates greens in a mixed message of nutrition and nationalism.
The rise of multiculturalism among a collection of distinct identities (feminist, socialist, afrocentrist, etc.
These enable the articulation of a principle of conflict within the agent's work of recomposition: in 1987 and 1990, the Anthony Griffin and Marcellus Francois affairs triggered the creation of AKAX (Also Known As X), an autonomist and Afrocentrist youth association, whose socio-political work was aimed at community reconstruction on the basis of racial rather than ethnic solidarity.
The book would be much more useful if the authors had dealt with some radical feminist, gay rights, ethnic pride, afrocentrist, environmentalist, and animal rights groups.
I personally think that rebutting the Afrocentrist slanders is a waste of time, but the task is done, even though no opinions will be changed on either side.
To display their impartiality, they offer some criticisms of claims by American Afrocentrist propagandists that African society is superior to European society and was, via ancient Egypt's influence on Greece, the true founder of Western civilization.
James, who argued in his Stolen Legacy (1954) that the Egyptian temples were centres of learning frequented by the Greeks and that Aristotle stole his philosophy from the Royal Library at Alexandria, is accepted Afrocentrist doctrine.
There is nothing fundamentally wrong with this approach to a discussion of Afrocentricity, since the Afrocentrist may have many different interests.