Afrocentrism

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Afrocentrism

A primarily American cultural philosophy which re-examines African American history and views the African American legacy as having been downplayed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Asante says the Thompson appointment, which was opposed by him and Mazama, represents the most recent effort by the department and the university to marginalize Afrocentricity as a theoretical foundation for Black studies and the basis around which the Temple department has been organized.
Afrocentricity seems to be emerging as one of the potent critical tools that could be used to re-establish and qualify African cultural identity through literary study among others.
Asante has championed Afrocentricity as a model to elucidate some of the African cultural motifs that have been carried over into new environments, including the United States, by African immigrants.
Some of the key concepts discussed include Afrocentricity (Molefi Asante), the TrEE model (Oscar Gandy), articulation theory (Stuart Hall), and guilt provocation (Dorothy Pennington).
I have selected three important Afrocentric texts in order to present a fairly representative sample of the various Afrocentric ideologies: Cheikh Anta Diop's Civilization or Barbarism (1991), Molefi Kete Asante's Afrocentricity (1990), and Chinweizu, Jemie, and Madubuike's Towards the Decolonization of African Literature (1983).
He has also published book chapters on Afrocentricity, poverty, and development.
Debates over Afrocentricity and a curriculum of inclusion are flashpoints for heated exchange, but also provide opportunity for positive change that could ameliorate racial discord on campus.
The reader is reminded that in 1971, Melvin Van Peebles' film Sweet Sweetback's Baadassss Song premiered, and in 1980, Molefi Kete Asante published Afrocentricity.
Crucially, a discussion about Afrocentricity is presented in this thesis in relation to African Renaissance ideal realization.
For a critique of Asante's Afrocentricity as a distinctive form of idealism rooted in religious mythology, read James Palermo, "Reading Asante's Myth of Afrocentricity: An Ideological Critique," www.
Notably, in the same way that Ishmael Reed utilized "jes grew," mumbo jumbo, jazz, and Afrocentricity m discuss the dominance of black culture in the West, Beatty turns to suicide poems, basketball, hip hop, and the failures of black political rhetoric to highlight fundamentally different black sexual politics that could potentially disrupt the groove of white supremacy and patriarchy, save the sometimes tempting benefits of commodified blackness.