Afrocentrism

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Afrocentrism

A primarily American cultural philosophy which re-examines African American history and views the African American legacy as having been downplayed.
References in periodicals archive ?
This exercise simultaneously hopes to expand the much-needed discussion of Afrocentric pedagogy to focus on the documentation of effectiveness.
AHA is a wholly owned subsidiary of AfroCentric Investment Corporation (ACT), a diversified investment holding company, which is managed by a number of black empowerment shareholders.
AfroCentric said that medical schemes can use this solution, deployed through Helios ITS' secure technological offering, to detect, review and investigate suspicious claims, members and providers, and deliver cost-effective quality care with integrity.
Designed in-house, Afrocentric Bamboo bikes are sturdy, affordable - $100 for the local market - and made for the high terrain and rough roads of rural Ghana.
The revised edition of Kwame Nkrumah s Contribution to Pan-Africanism: An Afrocentric Analysis by Zizwe Poe demonstrates an unprecedented critical and meticulous analysis both of Kwame Nkrumah's political vision and of the idea of Pan-Africanism, which encompasses African/African American history, politics, and sociology.
African American scholar and author Asante, founder of the Afrocentric movement for a united Africa, reflects on his roots and how they shaped his thinking.
Summary: Fashion has never been as Afrocentric and African designers at the Dakar Fashion Week gave their own spin to prints and fabrics inspiring celebrities and fashion houses.
The model defines families of African descent from an Afrocentric intergenerational perspective.
Conservative bloggers and pundits have raised concerns about Wright's Afrocentric theology and his liberal--some say radical--politics.
Thus, an Afrocentric model has been created; however, there remains a lack of usage of this pedagogy in schools and educational institutions.
Afrocentric notions like the idea that melanin might have properties beyond mere coloring or that Egypt is an African civilization (might just be the geography that gave that away) have perturbed conservative and liberal academics alike.
After an informative Introduction by Professor Adeleke, this seminal anthology addresses "Africa in the Early American Experience: The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries" (Abel Bartley); focuses upon "The Black Press and Africa in the 19th Century Black American Struggle for Equality" (Johnson Adefila); covers "The Fragile and Utilitarian Nature of Afrocentric Consciousness and Identity: A Historical Validation (Tunde Adeleke); offers "New Light on Africa: Afrocentricity Vs.