Afrikaner

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Afrikaner

Afrikaans name for Bos indicus cattle. Called also Africander.
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In Schoeman's ethical vision of a dystopian Afrikanerdom, the circle inscribed around the self is the laager.
This migration marks, symbolically, Afrikanerdom coming full circle: opting finally for the protection of what remains of liberalism.
See, for example, Moodie, The Rise of Afrikanerdom, 39.
The unknown translator and the editor/subeditor of the page in Sechaba set aside the question of the literary value of the poem and instead interpellated Krog as a young voice of hope from within hegemonic Afrikanerdom for the anti-apartheid struggle.
When I started thinking that this book might also be a cultural critique, you know of Afrikanerdom and whatever, I first started with a knitting manual, but it didn't have enough of the right vocab, because I had to give Agaat an attribute, and the knitting didn't have .
He wants shout open the portals of Afrikanerdom for the "brown man" [.
the most prominent Sestigers, the existentialism of Camus and Beckett, in fictionalised labyrinthine forms, either loses itself in its own cleverness or jerks its concerns about good, evil, sex, anxiety and despair into mocking rebellions by renegade sons against the dour fathers of Afrikanerdom.
It was typical of Mandela to march headlong into a bastion of white Afrikanerdom -- in this case the temple of South African rugby -- and make its followers feel they belonged in the new South Africa.
For he had marched headlong into a bastion of white Afrikanerdom — the temple of South African rugby — and made its followers feel they belonged in the new South Africa.
In fact, although such discoveries appear to fly in the face of Stellenbosch's reputation as being a bastion of arch-conservative Afrikanerdom, the area would appear to be leading the way in what still seems to be a minority sport elsewhere in the country.
In Agaat, van Niekerk exchanges the patriarchal Judeo-Christian religious discourse at the core of Afrikanerdom for an alternative belief system that is based on a pre-Christian, ecologically-aware and feminine theosophy.
As Tim Ciynick notes, during the late 1920s, the Pact's social engineers and moral reformers took the state in new and intrusive directions, seeking to manage and improve the lives of white rural poor whose proliferating numbers - along with the demoralization and degradation that they evoked - seemed to threaten Afrikanerdom and the foundations of white rule itself.