Afipia felis

Afipia felis

A motile gram-negative rod which causes some cases of cat-scratch disease, most of which are due to Bartonella henselae. Rare cases of CSD are also attributed to Bartonella clarridgeiae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Isolation of new fastidious alpha Proteobacteria and Afipia felis from hospital water supplies by direct plating and amoebal co-culture procedures.
Afipia felis in hospital water supply in association with free-living amoebae.
thiooxydans [greater than [greater than or equal to] 1:50 or equal to] 1:25 Mesorhizobium amorphae [greater than [greater than or equal to] 1:100 or equal to] 1:25 Azorhizobium caulinodans [greater than [greater than or equal to] 1:100 or equal to] 1:25 Afipia felis [greater than [greater than or equal to] 1:100 or equal to] 1:25 A.
Isolation of new fastidious [alpha] Proteobacteria and Afipia felis from hospital water supplies by direct plating and amoebal co-culture procedures.
These findings should be interpreted cautiously as water contamination probably led to the initial false attribution of Afipia felis as the causative organism of cat-scratch disease (55).
Isolation of new fastidious Proteobacteda and Afipia felis from hospital water supplies by direct plating and amoebal coculture procedures.
Afipia felis is a hospital water supply in association with free-living amoebae.
We tested serum specimens from three groups of patients with pneumonia by indirect immunofluorescence against Legionella-like amoebal pathogens (LLAPs) 1-7, 9, 10, 12, 13; Parachlamydia acanthamoeba strains BN 9 and Hall's coccus; and Afipia felis.
Afipia felis (once thought to be the etiologic agent of cat-scratch disease), a gram-negative rod, is difficult to grow on artificial medium but grows well in human monocytes and HeLa cells (4); this organism was recently reported to be an environmental bacterium probably associated with free-living amoebae and living in water (5).