Aesculapius


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Aesculapius

 [es″cu-la´pe-us]
the god of healing in Roman mythology. The staff of Aesculapius, a rod or staff with a snake entwined around it, is a symbol of medicine and is the official insignia of the American Medical Association.
Staff of Aesculapius.

Aesculapius

/Aescu·la·pi·us/ (es″ku-la´pe-us) [L.] the god of healing in Roman mythology; see also caduceus and under staff.

Aesculapius

(ĕs′kyə-lā′pē-əs)
n. Roman Mythology
The god of medicine and healing.

Aes′cu·la′pi·an adj.

Ӕsculapius

[es′kyoo͡lā′pē·əs]
the ancient Greek god of medicine. According to legend, Ӕsculapius, the son of Apollo, was trained by the centaur Chiron in the art of healing; he became so proficient that he not only cured sick patients but also restored the dead to life. Because Zeus feared that Ӕsculapius could help humans escape death altogether, he killed the healer with a bolt of lightning. Later, Ӕsculapius was raised to the stature of a god and was worshipped also by the Romans, who believed he could prevent pestilence. Serpents were regarded as sacred by Ӕsculapius, and he is symbolized in modern medicine by a staff with a serpent entwined about it. See also staff of Ӕsculapius.

Aesculapius

The Greek mythological son of Apollo. Aesculapius was the God of medicine. His symbol was the snake twined round a staff-now the universal symbol of medicine. His daughters were Hygeia and Therapia, representing, respectively, preventive medicine and medical treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
For information about the Aesculapius Award , please contact the Award Coordinator at 301-320-0965 or by email at award@hii.
30) The medal's verso features a representation of Aesculapius seated beneath a tree, his right hand raised to shield his face from the image above him of Jupiter, poised to hurl his thunderbolt (fig.
During his visit to the Temple of Aesculapius, Marius draws this connection between health and goodness, or, more specifically, between the well-being evidenced on the surface and that experienced (phenomenologically) in the whole.
William Hazlitt, for example, speaks of Coleridge's high forehead, "light as if built of ivory" (23); De Quincey mentions his "resplendent acreage of cheek" and comes "to understand that the glistening face, glorious from afar like the old Pagan face of the demigod Aesculapius, simply reported the gathering accumulation of insensible perspiration" (36); and Southey confesses that "his countenance is the most variable that I have ever seen" (46).
Army, while modernizing its uniforms and insignias in 1902, made a curious error by conflating the staff of Aesculapius and the caduceus, substituting the latter for the former (the true ancient symbol of medicine).
Aesculapius was the god of healing, and his "logo" had a single serpent.
At this point it is worth pausing for a moment to note that Apuleius tells in the Apology of a speech he gave soon after he arrived in Oea in which he celebrated the god Aesculapius -- implying that he spoke to an audience who knew the god.
Benjamin Wolman (New York: Aesculapius, 1977), 6: 231.
He cited the oath's beginning, in which the new physician swears by Apollo, Aesculapius, Hygieia, Panacea, and all the other Greek gods and goddesses.
The Orosius-translator uses it also in Escolapius and Escolafius for Aesculapius (ed.
The 2004 Aesculapius Awards have recognized the online health site Reflux1.
3) in the case of a lease analyzer: connecting the analyzer to the hospital network Aesculapius - not applicable Package No.