Aesculapius


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Aesculapius

 [es″cu-la´pe-us]
the god of healing in Roman mythology. The staff of Aesculapius, a rod or staff with a snake entwined around it, is a symbol of medicine and is the official insignia of the American Medical Association.
Staff of Aesculapius.

Aesculapius

/Aescu·la·pi·us/ (es″ku-la´pe-us) [L.] the god of healing in Roman mythology; see also caduceus and under staff.

Aesculapius

(ĕs′kyə-lā′pē-əs)
n. Roman Mythology
The god of medicine and healing.

Aes′cu·la′pi·an adj.

Ӕsculapius

[es′kyoo͡lā′pē·əs]
the ancient Greek god of medicine. According to legend, Ӕsculapius, the son of Apollo, was trained by the centaur Chiron in the art of healing; he became so proficient that he not only cured sick patients but also restored the dead to life. Because Zeus feared that Ӕsculapius could help humans escape death altogether, he killed the healer with a bolt of lightning. Later, Ӕsculapius was raised to the stature of a god and was worshipped also by the Romans, who believed he could prevent pestilence. Serpents were regarded as sacred by Ӕsculapius, and he is symbolized in modern medicine by a staff with a serpent entwined about it. See also staff of Ӕsculapius.

Aesculapius

The Greek mythological son of Apollo. Aesculapius was the God of medicine. His symbol was the snake twined round a staff-now the universal symbol of medicine. His daughters were Hygeia and Therapia, representing, respectively, preventive medicine and medical treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
30) The medal's verso features a representation of Aesculapius seated beneath a tree, his right hand raised to shield his face from the image above him of Jupiter, poised to hurl his thunderbolt (fig.
In this context, and with the purpose of promoting the caduceus analysis as the expression of a functional and real connection related to the reality of Man and also as a dialectic relation of opposites, sensitive and spiritual life, of life and death, of health and illness3, we recover in this communication the tradition of Aesculapius legend of to determine those symbolic elements that allow us to expand and give sense to the comprehension horizon of caduceus at the beginning of the 21st century.
Furthermore, that is the theme of the final reel of the order, the opening of Twice a Man, which retells the myth of Hippolytus and his resurrection by Aesculapius.
41) Some provide basic facts about characters: "Calchas, excellent prophet and diviner," "Clytemnestra, wife of Agamemnon," "Vulcan serves as wine-steward and makes the gods laugh when they see that he limps when he walks," "Machaon the doctor, son of Aesculapius Tris[megistus].
42) There was also a measure of fidelity to Aesculapius, the God of Medicine, and the balancing of bodily humors including blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and black bile--the last of which, when used in overabundance, was said to cause meloncholia.
Now, there was something low, mean, unprofessional, and democratic in this; so, at least, said the children of Aesculapius gathered together in conclave at Barchester.
Part of the Hippocratic Oath is: "I swear by Apollo the physician, by Aesculapius, Hygeia, and Panacea, and I take to witness all the gods, all the goddesses, to keep according to my ability and my judgment.
Por la misma razon de la carga docente tardo bastante en entregarnos varios disenos todos basados en un mismo emblema muy estilizado del baston y la serpiente de Aesculapius.
Por otra parte, el hecho de que, entre las dos "pretoriae" en que se dividia la flota romana reorganizada por Augusto, hubiera buques con nombres tan significativos como la trirreme Asclepius y la liburna Aesculapius, entre los que tenian su base en Miseno; u otra trirreme con el mismo nombre de Aesculapius entre las que operaban desde Clase, les inclina a pensar que pudieran tener cometidos sanitarios.
Mine, daughters Rose (15) and Miranda (13), did a fantastic job up and down the steep hills while I clung to the seat and explained how the original 17th-century gardens (owned by Pope Paul V's nephew, Cardinal Scipione Caffarelli Borghese) had mostly been lost to a nineteenth century makeover in the English style, hence the pretty neo-classical temple of Aesculapius overlooking the lake.
Mine, daughters Rose (15) and Miranda (13), did a fantastic job up and down the steep hills while I clung to the seat and explained how the original 17th century gardens (owned by Pope Paul V's nephew, Cardinal Scipione Caffarelli Borghese) had mostly been lost to a 19th century make over in the English style, hence the pretty neo-classical temple of Aesculapius overlooking the lake.
Jean Simon Pictet (1914-2002, scholar of international and humanitarian law, and a leading member of the International Committee of the Red Cross) noted that "Many centuries before our era, the Athenian fleet included a vessel called Therapis, while in the Roman fleet was a ship bearing the name Aesculapius.