Aerotoxic Syndrome

Aerotoxic Syndrome

A popular term for the short- and long-term effects of exposure to cabin air in commercial aircraft that contains atomised petrochemicals (fuel, oil, hydraulic fluid, de-icing fluid) and other substances, linked to the design of the cabin ventilation which is supplied by engine “bleed air”.
Alleged clinical findings Cognitive changes, dizziness, disorientation, nausea, dyspnoea, anxiety, mood swings, malaise, diarrhoea, tremors and various neurologic complaints, especially linked to the autonomic nervous system. The peer reviewed data is scant and inconclusive. It is not known whether aerotoxic syndrome is a valid entity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The toxins, found in substances including jet engine oil, have been linked to several deaths under the term Aerotoxic syndrome.
Lawyer Frank Cannon wants to force an inquest into Richard's death where BA could be quizzed about aerotoxic syndrome.
Dr Myhill believes that she has been targeted by the GMC because of her interest in allergy and nutritional medicine which she uses to treat a wide range of conditions from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME), Gulf War Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder, to Organophosphate poisoning and Aerotoxic Syndrome, amongst others.
The nausea, distorted vision, memory loss, slurred speech and chronic fatigue that Hoyte came to associate as part and parcel of his job, and which finally cost him his job, are all symptoms that scientists say are due to Aerotoxic Syndrome.
Found in modern jet oil, TCP can lead to drowsiness, headaches, respiratory problems or neurological illnesses-a condition scientifically know as Aerotoxic Syndrome.
Air health watchdogs have vowed to investigate any links between Aerotoxic Syndrome and Deep Vein Thrombosis.
An investigation found 13 commercial pilots tested positive for toxic poisoning - also known as Aerotoxic Syndrome - which causes dizziness and memory loss.
Many believe exposure causes a debilitating long-term illness known as aerotoxic syndrome, which is often not spotted by doctors due to lack of awareness.
Scientists say the condition - known as Aerotoxic Syndrome - also hits around 200,000 passengers every year.
PILOT John Hoyte had to quit his pounds 50,000-a-year job because of Aerotoxic Syndrome.
But campaigners say chemicals in engine oil can also enter cabins despite safety devices meant to stop fumes, causing a condition called aerotoxic syndrome.