egophony

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egophony

 [e-gof´o-ne]
increased resonance of voice sounds, with a high-pitched bleating quality, heard especially over lung tissue compressed by pleural effusion; called also egobronchophony.

e·goph·o·ny

(ē-gof'ŏ-nē),
A peculiar broken quality of the voice sounds, like the bleating of a goat, heard about the upper level of the fluid in cases of pleurisy with effusion.
[G. aix (aig-), goat, + phōnē, voice]

egophony

/egoph·o·ny/ (e-gof´ah-ne) increased resonance of voice sounds, with a high-pitched bleating quality, heard especially over lung tissue compressed by pleural effusion.

egophony

[ēgof′ənē]
a change in the voice sound of a patient with pleural effusion or pneumonia as heard on auscultation. When the patient is asked to make [ē-ē-ē] sounds, they are heard over the peripheral chest wall as [ä-ä-ä] , particularly over an area of consolidated or compressed lung above the effusion. Also called tragophony.
An extreme form of bronchophony, in which spoken words assume a nasal or bleating—goat-like—quality, which is most common when there is simultaneous lung consolidation and pleural fluid accumulation, but also heard in uncomplicated lobar pneumonia or pulmonary infarction

egophony

Pulmonary medicine An extreme form of bronchophony, in which spoken words assume a nasal or bleating–Greek, aïgos, goat–quality, which is most common when there is simultaneous lung consolidation and pleural fluid accumulation, but also heard over uncomplicated lobar pneumonia or pulmonary infarction. See Bronchophony.

e·goph·o·ny

(ē-gof'ŏ-nē)
A peculiar broken quality in voice sounds, like the bleating of a goat, heard about the upper level of the fluid in association with cases of pleurisy with effusion.
[G. aix (aig-), goat, + phōnē, voice]

egophony

egobronchophony.

egobronchophony, egophony

increased vocal resonance with a high-pitched bleating quality of the transmitted voice or other sound, detected by auscultation of the lungs, especially over lung tissue compressed by pleural effusion.