adoptive immunotherapy

(redirected from Adoptive Cellular Immunotherapy)
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a·dop·tive im·mu·no·ther·a·py

passive transfer of immunity from an immune donor through inoculation of sensitized lymphocytes, or antibodies in serum or gamma globulin.

adoptive immunotherapy

n.
A form of immunotherapy used in the treatment of cancer and certain viral infections in which lymphocytes taken from a patient are stimulated, activated, and infused back into the patient.

Adoptive Immunotherapy

A form of passive immunisation in which sensitised cells or serum are transferred to an immunologically naive or lymphocyte-depleted recipient—e.g., for managing cancer, as in the use of IL-2/LAK cells.
About 10% of patients with terminal renal cell carcinoma and melanoma achieve partial or complete remission with LAK/IL-2; some response to LAK cells may occur in colorectal carcinoma and Hodgkin lymphoma; the effects may be dose-dependent, non-MHC-restricted, and require simultaneous high-dose IL-2.

a·dop·tive im·mu·no·ther·a·py

(ă-dop'tiv im'yū-nō-thār'ă-pē)
Passive transfer of immunity from an immune donor through inoculation of sensitized lymphocytes, transfer factor, immune RNA, or antibodies in serum or gamma globulin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sorrento's strategy is to enable a multi-pronged approach to combating cancer with small molecules, mono- and bi-specific therapeutic antibodies, ADCs and adoptive cellular immunotherapy.
Genesis Biopharma is developing Contego[TM], a ready-to-infuse adoptive cellular immunotherapy (ACT) using tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) for the treatment of Stage IV metastatic melanoma.
Adoptive cellular immunotherapy is when syngeneic activated T-cells are infused in patients to attack their cancers.