adoption

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adoption

[ədop′shən]
Etymology: L, adoptere, to choose
a selection and inclusion in an established relationship or a choice of treatment protocol.

Adoption

The act of lawfully assuming the parental rights and responsibilities of another person, usually a child under age 18, typically due to infertility; 8,000 babies/year enter the US adoption pool, most from underdeveloped countries; about 2% of children < age 18 in the US are adopted.
Health profile Adoptees comprise 5% of children in psychotherapy, 6–9% of those with learning disabilities, 10–15% of those in residential treatment or psychiatric hospitals.
Medical problems in international adoptees
• Infections Giardia lamblia, Trichuris trichiura, Blastocystis hominis, tuberculosis, HBV, chronic diarrhoea, poor hygiene
• Medical problems Neurologic, haematologic, renal, metabolic
• Psychological Sensory deprivation and/or physical abuse by care-givers
• Nutrition Malnutrition, rickets

adoption

Social medicine The act of lawfully assuming the parental rights and responsibilities of another person, usually a child under the age of 18; the care and nurturing of a child by a non-blood-related adult who assumes the roles, rights, and obligations of a natural parent; 2% of children < age 18–US are adopted–± 1 million. See Cooperative adoption, Designated adoption, Independent adoption, Infant adoption, Informal adoption, Open adoption, Relative adoption, Semiadoption, Simple adoption, Traditional adoption, Transracial adoption, Wrongful adoption, Zygote adoption.

adoption

1. of alien young. Individual dams of all species may adopt strange neonates, and some ewes will even attempt to poach from others, but special measures have to be taken in most cases to foster alien young. Sows are probably the easiest to deceive. Queens will accept foster kittens if they are within about 2 weeks of the age of their own kittens. Reluctant ewes may accept strange lambs only if they are rubbed with secretions from their own.
2. also used in reference to the placing of stray or otherwise unwanted dogs and cats into ownership, as stray animals obtained from an animal shelter.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Child Tax Credit is a nonrefundable credit for eligible taxpayers who may claim the credit for each qualifying dependent (under age 17 and the taxpayer's child, stepchild, adopted child, grandchild, or eligible foster child).
Under new guidelines ministers said every adopted child will have the right to find out who their real parents were and where they lived.
The company offers the same benefits to same-sex domestic partners as it does married partners, including bereavement leave, relocation benefits, and an adoption benefit that reimburses couples up to $3,500 per adopted child.
The students also made cards so their adopted child will know that people care about them,'' said Kathy Brooks, parent volunteer and coordinator of program.
Using Child and Family Care Leaves of Absence, parents may take up to 12 months of unpaid leave to care for a newborn or newly adopted child, and be guaranteed reinstatement to a full-time job of like status and pay at the end of the leave.
I'm upset you feel my advice somehow gave the impression that it was acceptable to "give back" an adopted child if they turned out to be less than perfect.
Wendy's International provides eligible company employees a paid leave of absence and up to $4,000 in fees and legal costs per adopted child and $6,000 for special needs children.
Now an adopted child may hear, "Yes, sweetheart, we adopted you and you grew in mommy's tummy.
The average age of an adopted child in the UK is now about five years (Department for Education and Skills, 2004).
There was an almost equal distribution of male and female (51% male and 49% female) and most (90%) families shared the same ethnic background as their adopted child.
Adopting Older Children" is a thorough guide that enumerates the issues an older adopted child faces and provides a comprehensive overview of problems and how adopting parents can successfully deal with them, including critical information about developmental issues; problems related to the adoptee's emerging sense of self, including sexual orientation and cultural identity; and other special needs that children may have.